Skip to content

Programs : Brochure

This page is the brochure for your selected program. You can view the provided information for this program on this page and click on the available buttons for additional options.
  • Locations: Athens, Greece; Nafplio, Greece
  • Program Terms: Summer Quarter
  • Budget Sheets: Summer Quarter
Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year App Deadline Decision Date Start Date End Date
Summer Quarter 2018 01/31/2018 02/07/2018 06/21/2018 08/18/2018
Program Information:

sociology italysociology italy
QUICK FACTS
Location Nafplio, Greece
Academic Term Summer Quarter 2018
June 21 – August 18, 2018
Estimated Program Fee $5,950
Credits 15 UW Credits
Prerequisites None
Program Directors Dr. Taso G. Lagos; Dr. Nektaria Klapaki
Program Manager Katherine Kroeger | studyabroad@uw.edu
Priority Application Deadline January 31, 2018
Information Sessions Personal Informational Sessions with Dr. Lagos via Skype or phone (please email: taso@uw.edu)
HIGHLIGHTS
General A fun, compelling and intense program that puts students in the front line of witnessing social discrimination and exclusion, but also learning what can be done about it!
 

Program Description

The program focuses on the role of travel, migration and tourism for Greece and the Balkans. These topics, and the politics behind them, are explored within social, political, economic and cultural contexts, as well as by studying the Roma communities of two Greek cities – Athens, and the picturesque resort town of Nafplion.

Students appreciate how Greece was constructed as a magnet destination for European and American travelers in the 19th and 20th centuries; why during the 1950s and 1960s the Greeks were forced to emigrate to Western Europe and to other western countries in search of a better life; why Greece became, especially from the 1990s onwards, a host country for immigrants from the Balkans and elsewhere; and how the phenomenon of mass tourism impacted the economy as well as the culture of Greece.

Within this framework some of the topics of study is the perception and representation of Greece and the Greeks by Western European and American travelers; the construction of the tourist gaze about Greece; the relation of Greece with neighboring Balkan countries, especially Albania, formerly the largest exporter of illegal immigrants to Greece; the question of human rights of the undocumented immigrants in Greece; the political and social tensions that the phenomenon of mass immigration caused in Greece; the emergence of multiple cultural identities following the arrival of immigrants but also the arrival of tourists in Greece, and the transformation of Greece from a ‘mono-cultural’ to a ‘multi-cultural’ country.

We will also continue our research work from the past two years on the Roma communities of Athens and Nafplion, in both learning more about their social exclusion and providing any positive assistance breaking down social barriers and exclusion.

This is a rich, intensive, challenging yet rewarding program that includes interviewing local residents and conducting participating observation about the issue of migration in the Balkans. We spend time conducting field-work – both in visiting sites that clarify the issue of Roma exclusion, but also in students doing holding conversations with stakeholders involved with local Roma communities. The Program includes planned excursions to the Acropolis and the New Acropolis Museum, Olympia (site of the first Olympic Games), Sparta, the islands of Aegina, Spetses, and Hydra, Delphi, the unique monasteries of Meteroa, Mycenae and the home village of Dr. Lagos on the island of Euboea. Regularly scheduled group meals are included in the cost of the program.

LOCATION

Compass

Nafplio, Greece

Sites

Athens, Greece & Nafplio, Greece

Housing

In Athens – Students reside at the resident apartments of the American College of Greece that were used by the American athletes at the Athens 2004 Olympic Games. Apartments have their own bathrooms each and kitchen facilities. In Nafplion – Students stay at the Park that is used by Harvard faculty and students when they visit the city. It is a family hotel, comfortable with buffet breakfast included in the cost of accommodation, and within walking distance of the Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies.

ACADEMICS

Compass

Prerequisites and Language Requirements

None

Credits

15 UW Credits

Courses

JSIS E 111: Introduction to Modern Greek (5 Credits)

“Introduction to Modern Greek” is addressed to students with no prior knowledge of Modern Greek who wish to gain competence in the basic communicative functions of the Greek language. The course is open to participants of the program "Europe and the Balkans: Travelers, Migrants, and Tourists" (UW) only. This course will develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in the Modern Greek language at the elementary level (A1 Level of the Common European Framework of References for Language). Through classroom-based instruction and learning activities students will acquire the vocabulary needed to perform basic communicative tasks and will be introduced to the basic grammar and structural patterns of Modern Greek. Concomitantly, students will become familiar with several aspects of Modern Greek social life and everyday culture. The course aims to facilitate cultural immersion in the host community by enabling students to communicate in a number of familiar everyday situations in a Greek-speaking environment (e.g. introducing yourself, ordering a meal, asking for directions, etc.). Emphasis will be placed on the development of speaking and listening skills, but students will also learn the writing conventions of Modern Greek (the Greek alphabet, system of accentuation, etc.) and how to understand and control fundamental grammar structures. By developing these language skills, students will gain a basic socio-cultural competence, which will enable them to engage more effectively in everyday social interaction during their stay in Greece.

Learning goals include:
At the end of the course, students will be able to: Comprehend simple spoken utterances. Speak in order to: Greet others and initiate a conversation. Introduce yourself. Give basic information about yourself (e.g. where you come from, where you live, etc.). Ask simple questions about people, places and things. Give simple answers on familiar topics. Order a drink or a meal. Find a place of interest by asking for directions. Make purchases. Read basic communicative situation dialogs on familiar topics (e.g. ordering a drink) and short informational texts (e.g. restaurant/cafeteria menus). Produce short written sentences on familiar topics (e.g. greetings, sharing personal information, etc.). Comprehend elements of Greek everyday culture in order to: Be verbally polite in social interaction by using appropriately the formal/informal “you”. Understand and follow (at a basic level) social conventions and linguistic politeness phenomena in various formal/informal communicative events (e.g. when making requests or purchases, socializing over coffee or meal, etc.). Assessment takes place via written, oral and analytical exams, as well as completed work assignments (both in class and brought from home).


JSIS A 304: "From the Grand Tour to Modern Tourism: A Concise History of Travel to Greece (5 Credits)

This course is a concise history of travel to Greece beginning with the Grand Tour and ending with modern tourism. Taking its starting-point from the travelogues of some famous European and American travelers, such as Lord Byron, Mark Twain, Lawrence Durrell, Henry Miller and others, the course discusses the perceptions and representations of Greece and the Greeks by the above and other modern Western travelers; it examines the relationship of their representations with the discourses of Hellenism and Orientalism; and it places them in the contexts of imperialism and crypto-colonialism. Furthermore, considering the role of travel books and of various institutions connected with mass tourism, the course traces the modern emergence of the mass tourism market and it discusses how the tourist gaze about Greece is constructed. Last, the course explores the impact of travel and tourism on Greek history and identity, but also on the visitors of Greece themselves. In this context, students are invited to consider how they are affected by their journey to Greece and, conversely, how through their role as agents they can influence the country and its culture. Students have the opportunity to a. study key texts and themes in nineteenth- and twentieth-century travel literature b. study major topics in Modern Greek History and Modern European History c. acquire a better appreciation of how the idea of Greece shaped the Western imagination and culture d. learn how the West played a pivotal role in the emergence of modern Greece and the construction of modern Greek identity e. strengthen their writing and analytical skills by writing a paper in which they critically engage with primary and secondary sources Class attendance and participation: 15% One in-class quiz: 35% One paper of 6-8 double spaced pages: discussion of paper structure and of key ideas 20%; submitted paper 50%
 

JSIS 499: Undergraduate Research (5 credits)

This course guides students in the process of conducting ethnographic interviews in both Athens and the resort town of Nafplio in Peloponnese. The class actually “starts” during the pre-departure phase when students are introduced to our study – namely, focusing on public opinion on the issue of illegal migration to Greece. During this preparation phase, students will be asked to conduct online research on undocumented migration. Once in Greece, we will begin the interviews. Working in teams of three students, they will – 1. Be assigned to a different area of Athens (Pangratti, Kolonaki, Plaka and West Plaka). Each team will have an interviewer and two students who will record the interview 2. Each interview will be transcribed in a word file – not word for word, but as much of the conversation noted as possible. 3. Students will send the instructor a complete transcription of all the interviews conducted each night, along with an analysis of each interview 4. This is repeated for all interview sessions conducted. Not only do students gain valuable experience by conducting these interviews, but interact in a significant way with local residents. Each interview was annotated and analyzed.

Learning goals include:
Acquire skills in conducting original social science research Critically analyze original content (using content analysis) Feel confident in ability to interview participants in another culture and context Develop skills to make judgments about complex social problems * Further team building efforts Prepare for further analysis on the data gathered for possible article to be submitted to the Jackson School Journal All transcriptions and nightly summaries will be assessed for clarity, cogency and critical thinking skills using the 20 points scale (20 points being the highest).

PROGRAM LEADERSHIP

Compass

Dr. Taso G. Lagos, Jackson School of International Studies, Lecturer

Dr. Lagos was born and raised in Greece and founded the Athens Study Abroad Program in 2005 following his volunteering at the Athens 2004 Olympic and Paralympics Games. His interest in the Roma comes from his own personal reflection of stereotypes and discrimination he has felt in his own heart. This will be his 20th study abroad program at the University of Washington. He is the recent author of a biography of a successful Greek-American film theater pioneer published by McFarland Press. He serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Modern Hellenism in the fields of film and media.
taso@uw.edu

Dr. Nektaria Klapaki, Jackson School of International Studies, Lecturer

Dr. Klapaki works at the intersection of the fields of Modern Greek literature, Comparative literature and Reception Studies. Her publications include articles on epiphany in modern Greek literature, on various other aspects of modern Greek literature, and on modern travel literature. Her latest article is on “The Afterlife of the Greek Gods in the Modern World: The Revival of the Epiphanies of Pan and Dionysus in the Early Poetry of Angelos Sikelianos,” Classical Receptions Journal 9.4 (2017): 546-65. She serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Modern Hellenism in the fields of Modern Greek literature and culture.
nklapaki@uw.edu

FINANCES

Compass

Program Expenses

Estimated Program Fee: $5,950

Included in the program fee:

  • $450 Study Abroad Fee
  • Instruction
  • Housing
  • Program activities and program travel
Not included in the program fee:
  • Airfare (average price subject to when and where your buy your ticket - $1,900)
  • Food (about $20/day)
  • UW Student Abroad Insurance ($1.74/day)
  • Other health expenses/immunizations
  • Personal spending money


Payment Due Date: July 6, 2018

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. Check your MyUW Account periodically for due dates.

Financial Aid

  • A large percentage of UW students utilize financial aid to study abroad. Most types of financial aid can be applied to study abroad fees.
  • You can submit a revision request to increase the amount of aid for the quarter you are studying abroad. These additional funds are usually awarded in the form of loans.  To apply, fill out a revision request form, attach the budget sheet (available via the link at the top of this brochure) and submit these documents to the Office of Student Financial Aid.  For more information about this process, consult the Financial Aid section of our website.
  • Consult the Financial Aid section of our website for more information on applying for financial aid, special considerations for summer and early fall programs, and budgeting and fundraising tips.

Scholarships

  • There are many scholarships designed to fund students studying abroad. The UW administers a study abroad scholarship program and there are national awards available as well.
  • Scholarships vary widely in their parameters. Some are need-based, some are location-based, and some are merit-based.
  • For UW Study Abroad Scholarships fill out a short questionnaire on your UW Study Abroad program application to be considered.  You must apply by the priority application deadline for the program in order to be considered for a scholarship.  Click the Overview tab to view application deadlines.
  • Consult our Scholarships page to learn about UW-based and national scholarships. The Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards can help you learn about additional opportunities.

Budgeting Tools

We understand that figuring out your finances for study abroad can be complicated and we are here to help. Here are some ways to find additional support:

  • Click on the Budget Sheets link at the top of this brochure to view the estimated budget of all expenses for this program.
  • Contact the Global Opportunities Adviser at goglobal@uw.edu to learn more about how to pay for study abroad.
  • Attend a Financial Planning Workshop offered by UW Study Abroad – more information is on the Events page of our website.
  • Visit the Finances section of our website.

APPLICATION CONSIDERATIONS

Compass

Application Process

The study abroad application includes a personal statement, three short answer questions, one recommendation from a professor or TA, and electronic signature documents related to UW policies and expectations for study abroad. Following the online application process, you may be contacted by the program director for an in-person interview. Once an admission decision has been made regarding your application, you will be notified by the study abroad system via email.

Orientation

To be eligible to study abroad, you must attend an in-person pre-departure orientation facilitated by UW Study Abroad. You must also attend program-specific orientations offered by the program director.

You must register for the UW Study Abroad orientation. You can visit the Orientation section of our website to view the current schedule and to register for an orientation session.

Orientation must be completed prior to the enrollment deadline for the quarter that you are studying abroad.

Visas

UW Study Abroad is not responsible for obtaining visas for study abroad program participants. The cost and requirements for obtaining visas vary. It is your responsibility to determine visa requirements for all countries you plan to visit while abroad including countries that you plan to visit before or after your study abroad program. This is an especially important consideration if you are planning to do more than one study abroad program. You can research visa requirements by calling the consular offices of those countries or checking the following website: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html.

Note: If you are not a U.S. citizen, consult the embassy or consulate of the countries you will visit to learn their document requirements. You can check the following website to find contact information for the consulate of the country you will be visiting: https://www.state.gov/s/cpr/32122.htm.

For non-U.S. citizens, the procedures that you will need to follow may be different than those for U.S. citizens. It is important to initiate this process as soon as possible in order to assemble documents and allow time for lengthy procedures.

Disability Accommodations

The University of Washington is committed to providing access and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, and education for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodation for this program, contact Disability Resources for Students at least 8 weeks in advance of your departure date. Contact info at disability.uw.edu.

Withdrawals

$350 of the total program fee and the $450 UW Study Abroad Fee are non-refundable once a contract has been submitted. Students withdrawing from a program are responsible for paying a percentage of the program fee depending on the date of withdrawal. More details about the withdrawal policy are included in your payment contract. No part of the program fee is refundable once the program has begun. The date of withdrawal is considered the business day a withdrawal form is received by UW Study Abroad. Notice of withdrawal from the program must be made in writing by completing the following steps:

  1. Provide notice in writing to the program director that you will no longer be participating in the program.
  2. Submit a signed withdrawal form to UW Study Abroad.

Visit the Withdrawals section of our website for more information.