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  • Locations: Phnom Penh, Cambodia
  • Program Terms: Spring Quarter
Dates / Deadlines:

There are currently no active application cycles for this program.
Program Information:
sociology italy
     QUICK FACTS
 Location Phnom Penh, Cambodia
 Academic
 Term
Spring Quarter
March 28 - June 3, 2016
 Estimated    Program Fee $6,650
 Credits 12 UW credits
 Prerequisites  None
 Program      Directors Benjamin Spencer (Landscape Architecture); Robert Limanek (Landscape Architecture)
 Adviser Carrie Moore | carriemo@uw.edu
 Application    Deadline October 15, 2015
 Information  Session(s) October 9, 2015, 11:30am Gould Hall 100
       HIGHLIGHTS
  General Students will collaborate with students and faculty from the Royal University of Fine Arts to design and implement a small-scale community-driven intervention in one of Phnom Penh’s informal urban neighborhoods. The program will place particular emphasis on distributed infrastructure, multi-functional public space and social entrepreneurial approaches to income generation. It will harness the transformative power of participatory design as means of improving living conditions in informal urban communities and building the capacity of design students and community members to respond the challenges of urban poverty and climate change impacts.
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  More   
  About
 Program Description
 Where You Will Study
 Academics
 Expenses, Financial Aid, & Scholarships
 Application
 




Program Description

Climate change, inequitable economic development, and rapid informal urban growth are closely related issues. Over the next 50 years, drought, flooding, extreme weather events and other adverse conditions threaten to displace millions of people – spurring migration from rural to urban areas and from cities of crisis to cities of refuge. Climate change impacts will have particularly adverse effects on the urban poor in developing cities, urban slums are likely to proliferate and the living conditions of slum dwellers are likely to become increasingly precarious.

This is particularly true in Cambodia, one of the poorest nations in Southeast Asia. Although the country remains predominantly rural (79.9%, 2012) its urban population is growing rapidly. Phnom Penh is Cambodia’s largest city and has a population of over 2 million. One quarter of Phnom Penh’s population lives in low income settlements. With limited capacity for adaption, Cambodia is highly vulnerable to climate change impacts. Its agricultural areas will become increasingly susceptible to drought and flooding. Meanwhile, the concentration of capital in urban centers in likely to continue increase. Rural – urban migration and slum development is likely to accelerate. Indeed, a 25% increase in Phnom Penh’s slum population during 2012 may serve as an indication of things to come.

Many of Phnom Penh’s slum communities lack secure tenure and face the constant threat of eviction as market driven development pressure in the city increases. Access to reliable income generating opportunities are limited and poverty rates in Phnom Penh are increasing. Phnom Penh’s slum communities are also often located in low lying and polluted areas without drainage. They are susceptible to flooding, the contamination of drinking water and water-related diseases such as malaria and dengue fever. As climate change and urban development accelerate, the combination of these variables is likely to intensify the vulnerability of Phnom Penh’s urban poor.

In response to these challenges, students from the University of Washington participating in The Informal Urban Communities Initiative (IUCI): Phnom Pehn will collaborate with students and faculty from the Royal University of Fine Arts to establish a small-scale digital fabrication facility, develop a number of digitally fabricated products and design a closely related small-scale intervention with the potential to promote income generation in one of Phnom Penh’s informal urban neighborhoods. The program will place particular emphasis on social entrepreneurship and participatory design. It will build the capacity of students and community members to respond to the challenges of  urban poverty and climate change impacts. The specific focus and character of the products and intervention will grow out of priorities and preferences articulated by community members during participatory design workshops.

The student experience will be immersive. Daily activities will be undertaken in collaboration with students at RUFA and community members. Students will not only gain project related technical knowledge, they will gain skills in cross-cultural communication and applied development practice.

Angkor Wat 3b



Location

Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Sites

Phnom Penh, Siam Reap/Angkor Wat, and Tonle Sap Lake Village.




 

Housing

Students will stay in the Khavi Guest house (http://www.khaviguesthouse.com/). The housing was selected upon the recommendation of faculty at the Royal University of Fine Arts based on its proximity to RUFA, its security and its value.



 

Academics

Educational Goals

The IUCI: Phnom Penh program supports the Landscape Architecture Department’s focus on urban ecological design, design activism and culturally-based place-making. Where environmental conditions permit, in situ renovation of informal urban settlements, known as slum upgrading, represents a preferred approach to slum relocation/resettlement. It allows residents to remain in their homes, close to their social networks and close to their workplaces. Typical slum upgrading projects address issues of human health related to the built environment through the capital intensive, top-down implementation of centralized infrastructure projects. This approach is often limited by expense, corruption and a general lack of political will and fails to take advantage of participatory design processes and public education as means of empowering communities as stewards of their built environment, local ecological systems and community health. The IUCI: Phnom Penh program will offer an alternative, community-based approach to slum upgrading that espouses decentralized, flexible and adaptive infrastructural development expose students to the power of participatory design and teach them how to design with rather than for communities.

Pre-Requisites/Language Requirements/Physical Requirements

Preference given to graduate students in Landscape Architecture, Architecture, Urban Planning, Construction Management, Industrial Design and/or Engineering students; however, other disciplines are also welcome to apply.

There are no language requirements. Previous experience travelling to or working in developing countries desirable.

There will not be any significant physical requirements. Field trips and work on site will require walking and carrying some light loads.

Credits

12 Credits



RUFA 1

Courses

The Informal Urban Community's Initiative: Design | Build | Phnom Penh - LARC 503/700 (6 credits)

Students from the University of Washington participating in the IUCI: Phnom Pehn program will collaborate with students and faculty from the Royal University of Fine Arts to design and implement a small-scale community-driven intervention in one of Phnom Penh’s informal urban communities. The project will place particular emphasis on distributed infrastructure, multi-functional public space and social entrepreneurial approaches to income generation. It will harness the transformative power of participatory design as means of improving living conditions in informal urban communities and building the capacity of design students and community members to respond the challenges of urban poverty and climate change impacts. The specific focus and character of the on-site intervention will grow out of priorities and preferences articulated by community members during participatory design workshops.

The student experience will be immersive. Daily activities will be undertaken in collaboration with students at RUFA and community members. Students will not only gain project related technical knowledge, they will gain skills in cross-cultural communication and applied development practice.

Learning Goals: 

• Introduce students to community-based design activism in informal urban settlements
• Explore participatory methodologies
• Explore alternative approaches to urban infrastructure and technology
• Study the relationship between the built environment, culture, human health and ecological resilience

Students will be assessed based on their participation in meetings and activities associated with the design, implementation and assessment of a small-scale built project in one of Phnom Penh’s informal urban communities.

Digital Fabrication in Developing Cities - LARC 598 (3 credits)

The course will explore digital fabrication as a means of democratizing access to product development and production in developing cities. Students from the UW and RUFA will learn how to use digital fabrication software and equipment, to develop products with applications in developing urban communities and create business plans and go to market strategies.

Learning Goals: 

• Introduce students to technical aspects and applications of 3D modeling software
• Introduce student to technical aspects and application of digital fabrication equipment (eg. 3D printing)
• Explore the design and development of products with applications in informal urban communities
• Explore social entrepreneurial approaches to income generation and community development in informal urban communities

Students will be assessed based on proficiency in the use of digital fabrication equipment through a series of digital fabrication exercises, the quality of product design/development, and the quality of their business plans.

Architecture and Urban Form in Cambodia - LARC 495 (3 credits)

The course will introduce students to the History of Architecture and Urban Form in Cambodia including the architecture of the Khmer Empire, vernacular architecture, French colonial architecture, New Khmer architecture, and recent urban development in Phnom Penh. The class will include guest lectures from local academics and practitioners as well as visit to architectural sites in Phnom Penh (Olympic Stadium) and the surrounding region (eg. Angkor Wat). Student will keep journals and sketchbooks to record the qualities of the built environment during site visits.

Learning Goals: 

• Introduce students to history of Cambodia
• Introduce students to the history of Cambodia’s architecture and urban form
• Introduce students to the Cambodian genocide and recent urban development
• Provide historical and cultural context for the project students undertake during LARC 495

Students will be assessed based on critical writings in response to assigned readings and lectures and the reflective sketchbook/journal they develop during field trips.



Angkor Wat 2

Program Leaders

Benjamin Spencer, Associate Professor, Landscape Architecture, Program Director

bspen@uw.edu

Robert Limanek, Lecturer, Landscape Architecture, Program Director 



Program Expenses

Estimated Cost

Estimated Program Fee of $6,650, the UW Study Abroad Fee ($325), airfare, food (about $30/day), UW Study Abroad Insurance ($62/month), other health expenses/immunizations and personal spending money.

Average Airplane Ticket Price

$1,500* roundtrip

*Subject to when & where you buy your ticket

Payment Schedule

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. Check your MyUW Account periodically for due dates.

Payment Type Payment Amount Payment Due Date
Non-Refundable Study Abroad Fee $325 TBD
Program Fee Balance $6,650 TBD
TOTAL FEES CHARGED $6,975 -

 



Financial Aid and Scholarships

Most forms of financial aid can be applied to study abroad. You can verify that your financial aid award will apply to your program costs by contacting the Financial Aid Office. Financial aid or scholarships awarded as tuition waivers or tuition exemptions might not apply so you will need to verify that these funds are eligible for use with study abroad by contacting the funding office.

Financial aid and most scholarships are disbursed according to the UW academic calendar (at the beginning of the quarter). If your program starts before the start of the UW quarter, your financial aid will not be available to you prior to your departure. If your program starts after the first day of the quarter, your financial aid will be disbursed at the start of the program. In either of these cases, you will have to finance any upfront costs such as airfare, health insurance and the start of your time abroad on your own. Please take this into consideration when you are making plans.

Revision Request

In some instances you may qualify for an increase in your financial aid award (typically in loan funds). Check with the Financial Aid Office about your options. To request a revision in your aid, you will need to submit the following paperwork to the Financial Aid Office:

1. Revision Request Form

2. Budget of student expenses for your program: The UW Study Abroad Office will upload this budget to your study abroad account after a signed contract has been submitted to the UW Study Abroad Office. You can request an unofficial copy of this budget by emailing studyabroad@uw.edu.

Visit the Finances section of our website to learn more about disbursement, revising your aid package, short-term loans and scholarships.



Application Process

To apply for this exchange, click the "Apply Now" button and follow the prompts to create an application. After you create your application, click on each of the links on your study abroad application homepage and complete the remaining application requirements: questionnaires, material submissions, and electronic signature documents.

University exchanges may also require completion of a secondary application specific to the host institution. Instructions about this process will be provided to you by your study abroad advisor following your selection for the exchange.

See Applications and Recommendations for additional information about the application process and tips for recommendations.

See Withdrawal for UW program withdrawal policies.

 



Visas

UW Study Abroad is not responsible for obtaining visas for study abroad program participants. The cost and requirements for obtaining visas vary. It is your responsibility to determine visa requirements for all countries you plan to visit while abroad including countries that you plan to visit before or after your study abroad program. You can do so by calling the consular offices of those countries or checking the following website: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html.

Note: If you are not a U.S. citizen, consult the embassy or consulate of the countries you will visit to learn their document requirements. You can check the following website to find contact information for the consulate of the country you will be visiting: http://www.state.gov/s/cpr/rls/fco/index.htm

For non-U.S. citizens, the procedures that you will need to follow may be different than those for U.S. citizens. It is important to initiate this process as soon as possible in order to assemble documents and allow time for lengthy procedures.

 



Orientation

To be eligible to study abroad, all program participants must attend an in-person pre-departure orientation facilitated by the Study Abroad office as well as your program-specific orientations, offered by your program director.

You must register for orientation through your online study abroad account in order to attend scheduled orientations. You can visit the Orientation section of our website to view the current orientation schedule.

Orientation must be completed prior to the enrollment deadline for the quarter that you are studying abroad.




Disability Accommodations


The University of Washington is committed to providing access and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, and education for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodation for this program, contact Disability Resources for Students at least 8 weeks in advance of your departure date. Contact info at disability.uw.edu.





Withdrawals

$350 of the total program fee and the $325 UW Study Abroad Fee are non-refundable and non-revocable once a contract has been submitted, even if you withdraw from the program. Students withdrawing from a program are responsible for paying a percentage of the program fee depending on the date of withdrawal. More details about the withdrawal policy are included in your payment contract. No part of the program fee is refundable once the program has begun. The date of withdrawal is considered the date (business day) a withdrawal form is received by the UW Study Abroad Office. Notice of withdrawal from the program must be made in writing by completing the following steps:

1. Provide notice in writing to the Program Director that you will no longer be participating in the program for which you have signed a contract and accepted a slot.

2. Submit a signed withdrawal form to the UW Study Abroad Office, 459 Schmitz Hall.

Visit the Withdrawals section of our website for more information.
 


Angkor Wat 1b