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  • Locations: Athens, Greece; Nafplio, Greece
  • Program Terms: Spring Quarter
Dates / Deadlines:

There are currently no active application cycles for this program.
Program Information:
sociology italy
     QUICK FACTS
 Location Nafplion, Greece
 Academic
 Term
Spring Quarter 2018
March 14 – March 24, 2018
 Estimated    Program Fee $1,895
 Credits 1+5 UW credits
 Prerequisites N/A
 Program      Directors Dr. Taso G. Lagos; Katherine Kroeger
 Program  Manager Katherine Kroeger| studyabroad@uw.edu
 Application    Deadline November 15, 2017
 Information  Session(s) Contact Program Director for more information.
       HIGHLIGHTS
  General Students study the Roma (“Gypsies”) of Greece and what can be done to alleviate their social exculsion. A fun, inspiring and intense program!
  Read
  More   
  About
Where You Will Study
Academics
Expenses, Financial Aid, & Scholarships

Orientation
Application process
  Visas N/A


Program Description

This Spring Break program, hosted by Harvard University Center for Hellenic Studies in Greece, focuses on the Roma (“Gypsies”) and recent refugees in the country. It is an intense but richly rewarding program that puts students in the forefront of social injustice with an eye to reducing its poisonous and dehumanizing residue.

Even as students confront social exclusion, they also experience the extraordinary cultural legacy that is Greece, its wonderful hospitality and stunning landscape.

Happy, caring and thoughtful students make the best change agents in the world. A highlight of the program is the Mediation/Dialogue where students witness and participate in a dialogue between locals – both Roma and non-Roma – about discrimination. An event not soon forgotten.

All students participating in the Spring Break Greece Program are required to enroll in the 5-credit JSIS A 349 “Migration and Multiculturalism in the Mediterranean” class taught by Dr. Nektaria Klapaki in Spring Quarter, 2018. The class serves as a capstone to our work in Greece.

Dr. Klapaki’s Multiculturalism course explores the interplay between migration and multiculturalism in the modern and contemporary Mediterranean by focusing on the experiences of the Greeks from the nineteenth century to the present.

With the help of methodologies drawn from the social sciences and the humanities we examine migrant communities of the Greek diaspora in different historical periods and multicultural settings: as part of the port city of Smyrna in the late nineteenth-century Ottoman Empire and as part of modern Alexandria in twentieth-century Egypt.

Conversely, we consider how the phenomenon of immigration to Greece from the early 1990s onwards impacted Greek society, politics, institutions and cultures, with special attention placed on the recent Syrian refugee crisis. Our study will be situated within the context of modern Greek history, diaspora studies, migration studies, and Mediterranean studies, while a wide range of primary and secondary sources will be used to explore the above themes.

The Program includes planned excursions to the Acropolis and the New Acropolis Museum, Olympia, Palamidi castle, the island of Aegina and the ancient ruins of Mycenae.

Location

Nafplion, Greece

Housing

Our students stay at the Acropolis Hill Hotel in Athens and at the Park Hotel in Nafplion. Both hotels are very clean, comfortable (the Acropolis Hill has a pool!), with excellent service and daily buffet breakfasts. They are also within walking distances of restaurants, cafes, and shopping.

Academics

Pre-Requisites/Language Requirements/Physical Components

There are no pre-requisites or language requirements. Students learn some Greek prior to their departure for Athens. Any walking we do is normal and not strenuous.
Credits

1+5 UW Credits

Courses

JSIS A 349 (5 Credits)

This course explores the interplay between migration and multiculturalism in the modern and contemporary Mediterranean by focusing on the experiences of the Greeks from the nineteenth century to the present. With the help of methodologies drawn from the social sciences and the humanities we examine migrant communities of the Greek diaspora in different historical periods and multicultural settings: as part of the port city of Smyrna in the late nineteenth-century Ottoman Empire and as part of modern Alexandria in twentieth-century Egypt. Conversely, we consider how the phenomenon of immigration to Greece from the early 1990s onwards impacted Greek society, politics, institutions and cultures, with special attention placed on the recent Syrian refugee crisis. Our study will be situated within the context of modern Greek history, diaspora studies, migration studies, and Mediterranean studies, while a wide range of primary and secondary sources will be used to explore the above themess.

The course will be taught in Spring Quarter, 2018, on the UW Seattle campus.

Learning Goals: 

In In this class students will have the opportunity to: •Study certain aspects of the history of modern Greek diaspora •Study the contemporary phenomenon of immigration to Greece •Situate modern Greek history within a Mediterranean context •Examine the relationship between migration and multiculturalism.
 

JSIS 499 (1 Credit)

Students conduct original ethnographic interviews and are part of conversations and discussions involving Roma communities in Athens and Napflion. Stakeholders who work with the Roma as well as Roma members themselves are included in the conversations and discussions, and provide their perspective on the status of Roma in their communities. These conversations can be frank and eye-opening, but they also provide an entry into understanding why discrimination exists and persists. The concluding effort of our work in Greece is the Mediation/Dialogue that brings all the various guest-speakers into one room to face one another. It can be a powerful experience, with students both acting as witnesses to the event but also willing participants!

Learning Goals:

  • To become comfortable conducting ethnographic interviews in an international context
  • To acquire the tools necessary to draw thoughtful conclusions from the interviews and conversations that take place during the program
  • To become conversant in the language and traditions of ethnography as an important research tool that advances human knowledge
  • To explore the dimensions of ethnic marginalization through the lens of social interaction and participant observation
     

Program Directors & Staff

Dr. Taso G. Lagos, Department of JSIS, Program Director

taso@uw.edu

Katherine Kroeger, UW Study Abroad, Program Manager

kroegk@uw.edu

Program Expenses

Estimated program fee: $1,895

Included in the program fee
  • $450 Study Abroad Fee
  • Instruction
  • Housing
  • Program activities and program travel
Not included in the program fee
  • Airfare - average price subject to when and where you buy your ticket - $850
  • Food (about $3 to 5/day)
  • UW Student Abroad Insurance ($62/month)
  • Other health expenses/immunizations
  • Personal spending money

Payment Schedule

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. Check your MyUW Account periodically for due dates.

Payment Type Payment Amount Payment Due Date
TOTAL FEES CHARGED $2,345 April 13, 2018

Financial aid

  • A large percentage of UW students utilize financial aid to study abroad. Most types of financial aid can be applied to study abroad fees.
  • Students can also submit a revision request to increase the amount of aid for the quarter you are studying abroad. These additional funds are usually in the form of loans.
  • Consult the Financial Aid section of our website for more information on applying for additional financial aid, special considerations for Summer and Exploration Seminar program students, and budgeting and fundraising tips.

Scholarships

  • There are many scholarships designed to fund students studying abroad. The UW has some of our own, but there are also national awards available to you as well.
  • Scholarships vary widely in their parameters. Some are need-based, some are location-based and some are merit-based.
  • Consult our Scholarships page to learn about UW-based scholarships. The Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards can help you learn about additional opportunities.
We understand that figuring out your finances for study abroad can be complicated and we are here to help. Please do not hesitate to contact your Program Manager listed above if you have any questions about the information on this page, or in the Finances section of our website.

Orientation

To be eligible to study abroad, all program participants must attend an in-person pre-departure orientation facilitated by UW Study Abroad. You are also required to attend all program-specific orientations offered by your program directors.

You must register for orientation through your online study abroad account in order to attend a scheduled session. You can visit the orientation section of our website to view the current orientation schedule.

Orientation must be completed prior to the enrollment deadline for the quarter that you are studying abroad.

Application Process

The application includes:

  • four short answer questions
  • one faculty recommendation
  • electronic signature documents related to UW Study Abroad policies and expectations

Following the on-line application process students may be contacted by the Program Director for an in-person interview. Once an admission decision has been made regarding your application, you will receive an email from the UW Study Abroad application system.

Visas

UW Study Abroad is not responsible for obtaining visas for study abroad program participants. The cost and requirements for obtaining visas vary. It is your responsibility to determine visa requirements for all countries you plan to visit while abroad, including countries that you plan to visit before or after your study abroad program. You can do so by calling the consular offices of those countries or checking the following website: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html.

For Non-U.S. Citizens

If you are not a U.S. citizen, consult the embassy or consulate of the countries you will visit to learn their document requirements. You can check the following website to find contact information for the consulate of the country you will be visiting: http://www.state.gov/s/cpr/rls/fco/index.htm. The procedures that you will need to follow may be different than those for U.S. citizens. It is important to initiate this process as soon as possible in order to assemble documents and allow time for lengthy procedures.

Disability Accommodations

The University of Washington is committed to providing access and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, and education for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodation for this program, contact Disability Resources for Students at least 8 weeks in advance of your departure date. Contact info at disability.uw.edu.

Withdrawals

$350 of the total program fee and the $450 UW Study Abroad Fee are non-refundable once you have submitted a contract. Students withdrawing from a program may be responsible for paying a percentage of the program fee depending on the date of withdrawal. More details about the withdrawal policy are included in your payment contract. No part of the program fee is refundable once the program has begun. The date of withdrawal is considered the business day UW Study Abroad receives your signed withdrawal form.

Notice of withdrawal from the program must be made in writing by completing the following steps:

  1. Provide notice of your withdrawal in writing to the Program Director
  2. Submit a signed withdrawal form to UW Study Abroad, 459 Schmitz Hall

Visit the Withdrawals section of our website for more information.