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  • Locations: Kampala, Uganda
  • Program Terms: Early Fall
  • Homepage: Click to visit
Dates / Deadlines:

There are currently no active application cycles for this program.
Program Information:
sociology italy
     QUICK FACTS
 Location Kampala, Mbarara, Rwenzori/Fort Portal, Julu, and Mbale, Uganda
 Academic
 Term
Early Fall 2017
August 14 – September 8, 2017
 Estimated    Program Fee $5,000
 Credits 5 UW credits
 Prerequisites None
 Program      Directors Amy Hagopian, Scott Barnhart, Samuel Luboga, Susan Nasssaka
 Program  Manager Katherine Kroger | studyabroad@uw.edu
 Application    Deadline March 12, 2017 - EXTENDED!
 Information  Session(s) February 28, 4-5pm, 450 Schmitz Hall.
       HIGHLIGHTS
  General Students will engage in a month-long exploration of what makes people healthy and what undermines health in Uganda.
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  About
Where You Will Study
Academics
Expenses, Financial Aid, & Scholarships

Orientation
Application


Program Description

Students will engage in a month-long exploration of what makes people healthy and what undermines health in Uganda. The two U.W.-based faculty, Amy Hagopian and Scott Barnhart, have worked in Uganda for about 10 years. We have strong relationship with Professor Sam Luboga, our on-site program director, who has taught in the medical school at Makerere University in Kampala for many years. (The three have conducted research together, written publications together, and worked on multiple projects.) Because Uganda was colonized by the British, the primary language in universities and business is English, although local people also speak Luganda. This program, focused on the root causes of health and illness, is offered for the first time this year, is one of the few offerings in Africa, and is closely aligned with the goals of the new University of Washington Population Health Initiative led by President Cauce.

Students will each select one of Uganda’s key health problems (maternal and infant mortality, children’s diarrhea, HIV, tuberculosis, malaria, road traffic injuries, respiratory tract infections and cancer) and trace back the causes of these health problems to immediate and underlying causes. Each student will choose one of the problems, and prior to leaving for Uganda will conduct enough research (using UW library resources) to describe in a 5-page paper how the disease operates biologically and what the immediate causes are. Once on site in Uganda, students will learn more about the manifestations, care and treatment of these problems in the health system, through both lecture and clinical observation.

Upon arrival in Kampala, students will be paired with Makerere University students who will help them trace back the underlying causes of the health problem they chose. In collaboration with their Makerere partners, UW students will visit public places, markets, family homes, and other places where people live and work and play and go to school. The purpose of these visits is to learn how historical, social, economic, political, geographic and environmental factors in Uganda have contributed to the selected health problems. After lectures and daily field trips, students will compare notes in a daily meeting to discuss the common and disparate etiologies of problems. Students will be expected to keep daily journals, read local newspapers, eat in local restaurants or at the guest house, and otherwise immerse themselves in life in the nation’s capital city.

Lecturers, delivered by both UW and Makerere faculty as well as local health officials and community activists, will address the topics of determinants of health and illness, health and human rights, pathophysiology of high burden illnesses, role of education in health, income and food security in health. We will also address the control of epidemics, including how Uganda controlled Ebola in 2012.

After two weeks in the capital city and surrounding communities (Entebbe, Jinja), we will visit the communities of Mbarara, Rwenzori/Fort Portal, Gulu, and Mbale. In each location we will visit health facilities, talk with local health officials and care givers, and engage with people working or going to school there. Upon arrival back in Kampala, students will be expected to write a paper (or generate some other academic or creative product) describing the underlying contributing causes of their assigned health problem. We will assemble the Makerere student partners and those who provided lectures for a final team meeting and student presentations at the end of our month there. Overall course learning objectives are listed in the “Learning Goals” section below.

Site schedule: Arrival in Entebbe late at night on August 12, spend the night in an Entebbe hotel. Travel the hour-long journey to Kampala, set up camp in the Chrisams’ Guest House for the nights of August 13-22.

Use reserved vehicle and professional driver to travel west to Mbarara, Aug 23-26, where we will stay 4 nights at Mwengura Guest House. We will visit the hospital, the Century Bottling Plant, and investigate water availability in the region.

Continue with vehicles to the Rwenzuri Mountains on Aug 27, where we will explore the coffee cooperatives as an economic model. We will stay there 3 nights, Aug 27 through 29, at the Ruwenzori Guesthouse.

Heading north with our drivers, we will stay in Gulu two nights, visiting local health clinics and assess the proliferation of NGOs there, Aug 30 and 31.

A long day’s drive on Sept. 1 will take us to Mbale, in the east of Uganda. We will visit local economic enterprises and visit the health facilities there, staying Sept. 1 and 2.

September 3 we head back to Kampala, another long day’s drive. We will stay at Chrisam’s again Sept. 3 through 6. Students will write their papers during these days, consulting local resources as necessary.

We will spend the night of Sept. 7 in Entebbe, and will depart from the airport there on September 8.
 

Location

Kampala, Uganda

Sites

Mbarara, Rwenzuri Mountains/ Ft. Portal, Gulu

Housing

The Chrisam’s guest house is designed for accommodating groups such as ours in Kampala. We have selected guest houses in each of the cities we will visit that have sufficient and appropriate accommodation for our party.

Academics

Pre-Requisites/Language Requirements

Students should be mature, ready for travel to a low-income country, and comfortable with discomfort. Graduate and undergraduate students accepted. Graduate students would be encouraged to find a publishable project. Students from a variety of academic interests are encouraged, including health sciences, social sciences, journalism, history, international studies, anthropology, geography.

Credits

5 Credits

Courses

GH 490; GH 590 or HSERV 490; HSERV 590 (5 credits)

Students will engage in a month-long exploration of what makes people healthy and what undermines health in Uganda. Students will each select one of Uganda’s key health problems (maternal and infant mortality, children’s diarrhea, HIV, tuberculosis, malaria, road traffic injuries, respiratory tract infections and cancer) and trace back the causes of these health problems to immediate and underlying causes. Upon arrival in Kampala, students will be paired with Makerere University students who will work together with them on these projects; they will visit public places, markets, family homes, and other places where people live and work and play and go to school. The purpose of these visits is to learn how historical, social, economic, political, geographic and environmental factors in Uganda have contributed to the selected health problems. Students will be expected to keep daily journals, read local newspapers, eat in local restaurants or at the guest house, and otherwise immerse themselves in life in the nation’s capital city. After two weeks in Kampala and surrounding communities (Entebbe, Jinja), we will visit the communities of Mbarara, Rwenzori/Fort Portal, Gulu, and Mbale. In each location we will visit health facilities, talk with local health officials and care givers, and engage with people working or going to school there.

The two U.W.-based faculty, Amy Hagopian and Scott Barnhart, have worked in Uganda for about 10 years. We have strong relationship with Professor Sam Luboga, our on-site program director, who has taught in the medical school at Makerere University in Kampala for many years. (The three have conducted research together, written 10 publications together, and worked on multiple projects.) Because Uganda was colonized by the British, the primary language in universities and business is English, although local people also speak Luganda.

Learning Goals: 

  1. Explain the global burden of disease and other threats to health, especially in low-income countries, and identify their proximate and underlying causes.
  2. Describe the historical, social, economic, political, geographic and environmental determinants of health in Uganda.
  3. Outline the structure of the Ugandan health system, the role of primary health care, and the roles of non-governmental organizations in the health sector.
  4. Critique the international aid system in the health sector, and describe alternatives to current practice.
  5. Recommend changes to political, educational, health and other systems that would improve health in Uganda.
  6. Engage successfully in field work in Uganda, including successfully navigating cultural, language and logistical issues.
  7. Work effectively in an interdisciplinary team on a service learning project with a Ugandan partner.

Program Directors & Staff

Amy Hagopian, Department of Health Services, Program Director

http://sph.washington.edu/faculty/fac_bio.asp?url_ID=Hagopian_Amy and http://globalhealth.washington.edu/faculty/amy-hagopian

hagopian@uw.edu

Scott Barnhart, Department of Global Health & Medicine, Program Co-Director

http://globalhealth.washington.edu/faculty/scott-barnhart

sbht@uw.edu

Samuel Luboga, Department of Family Medicine, On-Site Director

lubogasam@gmail.com

Susan Nassaka, On-Site Coordinator

snakkaka@med.mak.ac.ug

Program Expenses

Cost: $5,000

Estimated Program Fee of $5,000, the UW Study Abroad Fee ($350), airfare, food (about $10-$15/day), UW Study Abroad Insurance ($62/month), other health expenses/immunizations and personal spending money.

Average Airplane Ticket Price

>$2,000* roundtrip

*Subject to when & where you buy your ticket

Payment Schedule

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. Check your MyUW Account periodically for due dates.

Payment Type Payment Amount Payment Due Date
Non-Refundable Study Abroad Fee $350 October 13, 2017
Program Fee Balance $5,000 October 13, 2017
TOTAL FEES CHARGED $5,350 -

Scholarships

There are a variety of scholarships available to help fund your study abroad experience. Visit the Global Opportunities page for more information and application deadlines.

Orientation

To be eligible to study abroad, all program participants must attend an in-person pre-departure orientation facilitated by the Study Abroad office as well as your program-specific orientations, offered by your program director.

You must register for orientation through your online study abroad account in order to attend scheduled orientations. You can visit the Orientation section of our website to view the current orientation schedule.

Orientation must be completed prior to the enrollment deadline for the quarter that you are studying abroad.

Financial Aid and Scholarships

Most forms of financial aid can be applied to study abroad. You can verify that your financial aid award will apply to your program costs by contacting the Financial Aid Office. Financial aid or scholarships awarded as tuition waivers or tuition exemptions might not apply so you will need to verify that these funds are eligible for use with study abroad by contacting the funding office.

Financial aid and most scholarships are disbursed according to the UW academic calendar (at the beginning of the quarter). If your program starts before the start of the UW quarter, your financial aid will not be available to you prior to your departure. If your program starts after the first day of the quarter, your financial aid will be disbursed at the start of the program. In either of these cases, you will have to finance any upfront costs such as airfare, health insurance and the start of your time abroad on your own. Please take this into consideration when you are making plans.

Revision Request

In some instances you may qualify for an increase in your financial aid award (typically in loan funds). Check with the Financial Aid Office about your options. To request a revision in your aid, you will need to submit the following paperwork to the Financial Aid Office:

  1. Revision Request Form
  2. Budget of student expenses for your program: The UW Study Abroad Office will upload this budget to your study abroad account after a signed contract has been submitted to the UW Study Abroad Office. You can request an unofficial copy of this budget by emailing studyabroad@uw.edu.

Visit the Finances section of our website to learn more about disbursement, revising your aid package, short-term loans and scholarships.

Application Process

The application includes a Personal Statement, three short answer questions, two recommendations from a professor or TA, and electronic signature documents related to UW policies and expectations for study abroad. Following the on-line application process students may be contacted by the Program Director for an in-person interview. Once an admission decision has been made regarding your application, you will be notified by the study abroad system via email.

Visas

UW Study Abroad is not responsible for obtaining visas for study abroad program participants. The cost and requirements for obtaining visas vary. It is your responsibility to determine visa requirements for all countries you plan to visit while abroad including countries that you plan to visit before or after your study abroad program. You can do so by calling the consular offices of those countries or checking the following website: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html.

Note: If you are not a U.S. citizen, consult the embassy or consulate of the countries you will visit to learn their document requirements. You can check the following website to find contact information for the consulate of the country you will be visiting: http://www.state.gov/s/cpr/rls/fco/index.htm

For non-U.S. citizens, the procedures that you will need to follow may be different than those for U.S. citizens. It is important to initiate this process as soon as possible in order to assemble documents and allow time for lengthy procedures.

Disability Accommodations

The University of Washington is committed to providing access and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, and education for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodation for this program, contact Disability Resources for Students at least 8 weeks in advance of your departure date. Contact info at disability.uw.edu.

Withdrawals

$350 of the total program fee and the $350 UW Study Abroad Fee are non-refundable and non-revocable once a contract has been submitted, even if you withdraw from the program. Students withdrawing from a program are responsible for paying a percentage of the program fee depending on the date of withdrawal. More details about the withdrawal policy are included in your payment contract. No part of the program fee is refundable once the program has begun. The date of withdrawal is considered the date (business day) a withdrawal form is received by the UW Study Abroad Office. Notice of withdrawal from the program must be made in writing by completing the following steps:

1. Provide notice in writing to the Program Director that you will no longer be participating in the program for which you have signed a contract and accepted a slot.

2. Submit a signed withdrawal form to the UW Study Abroad Office, 459 Schmitz Hall.

Visit the Withdrawals section of our website for more information.