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  • Locations: Berlin, Germany; Prague, Czech Republic; Vienna, Austria; Zagreb, Croatia
  • Program Terms: Summer Quarter
  • Budget Sheets: Summer Quarter
Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year App Deadline Decision Date Start Date End Date
Summer Quarter 2018 01/31/2018 02/07/2018 07/22/2018 08/05/2018
Program Information:

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QUICK FACTS
Location Berlin, Germany; Prague, Czech Republic; Vienna, Austria; and Zagreb, Croatia
Academic Term Summer A 2018
June 18 – August 15, 2018; Students will be abroad July 22-August 5, 2018
Estimated Program Fee $3,750
Credits 12 UW credits
Prerequisites Introductory Psychology (TPSYCH 101)
Program Directors Leighann Chaffee; Jenny Harris
Program Manager Courtney Kroll | uwtintl@uw.edu
Priority Application Deadline January 31, 2018
Information Sessions TBD. Contact Program Director for more information.
HIGHLIGHTS
General Explore themes of psychology, culture, and human nature in Central Europe, visiting Berlin, Vienna, Prague, and Zagreb. The history of central Europe unifes this program, as discussion of the world wars, rise and fall of communism, and modern escalation of prejudice in the face of the migrant crisis illuminates complex concepts in each course.
Visas U.S. citizens do not require a visa. If you are an international student, contact uwtintl@uw.edu ASAP.
 

Program Description

Explore themes of psychology, culture, and human nature in Central Europe, visiting Berlin, Vienna, Prague, and Zagreb. Dr. Harris instructs the Psychology of Superheroes, a course on the human motivations behind acts of heroism and evil, as well as the media’s portrayal of heroes and villains as modern day schematic prototypes. Leighann’s course on the Psychology of Food and Culture uses a biopsychosocial approach to explore the social, symbolic, and political-economic roles of food and eating. The history of central Europe unifies these two courses, as discussion of the world wars, rise and fall of communism, and modern escalation of prejudice in the face of the migrant crisis illuminate complex concepts in each course.

This program will be instructed in a hybrid format, with 5 weeks of face-to-face instruction on campus in advance of study abroad departure. The on-campus portion of the course will provide the academic background information to fully appreciate the global experience. Additionally, students will read the text Forty Autumns (Willner, 2016) in advance of departure. Coursework and assignments are detailed in the syllabus.

The program begins in Berlin, the perfect landscape to appreciate the impact of World War II and the holocaust, as well as the division of East and West in Communism. We will tour Sachsenhausen concentration camp, Eastside gallery (Berlin Wall) and other relevant sites. As we travel to Prague, Vienna, and Zagreb, students will contrast the culture and impacts of key historical events. In addition, we will continue to utilize our connections with Taste of Prague food tour in Czech Republic as well as Freud’s Museum, Schonbrunn Palace, and Narrenturm in Vienna, Austria. In-country coursework includes (academic) scavenger hunts and written reflection assignments. Our program will conclude with tours in Zagreb, Croatia, where students have the opportunity to contrast variable effects of 20th century European History, and we will explore issues of feminism, cuisine, and the experience of life in former Yugoslavia with a food and culture tour as well as a departure dinner. Students will complete a post-abroad writing assignment to summarize and reflect on the experience.

LOCATION

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Central Europe

Sites

Berlin, Germany; Prague, Czech Republic; Vienna, Austria; and Zagreb, Croatia

Housing

Students will be residing in shared occupancy hostels in each location.

Field Trips

The program begins in Berlin, the perfect landscape to appreciate the impact of World War II and the holocaust, as well as the division of East and West in Communism. We will tour Sachsenhausen concentration camp, Eastside gallery (Berlin Wall) and other relevant sites. As we travel to Prague, Vienna, and Zagreb, students will contrast the culture and impacts of key historical events. In addition, we will continue to utilize our connections with Taste of Prague food tour in Czech Republic as well as Freud’s Museum, Schonbrunn Palace, and Narrenturm in Vienna, Austria.

ACADEMICS

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Prerequisites and Language Requirements

Introductory Psychology (TPSYCH 101)

Credits

12 UW Credits

Courses

TPSYCH 404: Psychology of Food and Culture

Covers a global look at the social, symbolic, and political-economic roles of food and eating. Examines cultural, ethnic, and gender issues in relation to the production and consumption of food, as well as the neurobiological effects of certain foods on brain activity.

Learning goals include:
1. Describe the psychological and biological mechanisms responsible for the regulation of feeding behavior 2. Understand the cross-cultural variance in food and eating practices, including those specific to cultures of sites. 3. Critically evaluate pseudoscientific claims by countering them with empirical research. 4. Contextualize psychological theories and methodologies among other disciplinary approaches in the social and natural sciences. 5. Identify aspects of gender, cultural, psychological, biochemical, and environmental factors that predispose individuals toward specific food preferences and rituals


TPSYCH 445: Psychology of Superheroes

Explores media's portrayal of heroes and villains and how the indoctrination of good and evil through these stereotypical images influences one's self-concept, esteem, and knowledge. Examines modern day heroes or villains by surveying how individuals relate to others through acts of altruism, inaction, and aggression.

Learning goals include:
1. Acquire advanced knowledge of social psychology through both primary and secondary sources, and will learn relevant terms, facts, concepts, and theories. More specifically, students will gain an advanced understanding of the biological, psychological, and social factors related to the psychology of good and evil. 2. Improve higher-order thinking skills, including: (a) critical thinking about human nature, (b) evaluating theoretical assumptions, theories, and research, and (c) distinguishing between fact and opinion by identifying and synthesizing relevant and empirical research related to dispositional and situational factors related to good and evil 3. Understand and apply appropriate psychological terms in social psychology to the areas of good and evil through the preparation of papers, reflective journals, and presentations that explain some of the central reasons why groups of people condone and carry out harmful acts against members of other groups as well as ways to increase heroism, conflict resolution, and peace-making.

 

TPSYCH 498: Directed Readings in Psychology

Allows students to use directed readings and reflection assignments to engage with the cultural richness of the study abroad location under faculty supervision. Faculty will assign selected readings on the topic, with the plan of the text Forty Autumns, engage students in discussion, and students will write an APA-style paper analyzing the reading in the context of their experience.

Learning goals include:
1. Analysis of the text in context of the historical perspective of the text in light of principles from class. Students will identify and describe principles from both courses in this text.

PROGRAM LEADERSHIP

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Leighann Chaffee

My focus in Psychology is the biological basis of behavior. As a student, my studies in psychology focused on neuroscience and behavior. As a professional, I challenge myself to continue my study of neuroscience and the biological basis of phenomena in psychology. My current research focuses  on the cognitive and motivational processes that drive our attitudes and behaviors around food and eating. Additionally, I study the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, examining self-regulated learning in college students, the pathways by which students acquire these skills, and the relationship between these skills and student performance. This focus influences my instructional strategies and I aim to provide students to develop self-regulated learning skills within my courses. 
lchaffee@uw.edu

Jennifer Harris

I am currently the Director of Clinical Training for the Doctorate of Counselling Psychology program in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Northwest University. Previously, I was the Research Methods coordinator in undergraduate psychology at University of Washington Tacoma from 2012-2017. My research has primarily investigated predisposing, precipitating, and perpetuating factors of adolescent substance use as well as treatment outcomes. I developed an urge surfing treatment as aftercare for an evidence-based school intervention. I am especially interested in the effects of mindfulness. I have investigated self-care practices in undergraduate students. I also investigate important factors that defense attorneys consider when recommending plea bargains.
jenny.harris@northwestu.edu

FINANCES

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Program Expenses

Estimated Program Fee: $3,750

Included in the program fee:

  • $450 Study Abroad Fee
  • Instruction
  • Housing
  • Program activities and program travel
Not included in the program fee:
  • Airfare (average price subject to when and where your buy your ticket - $1700)
  • Food (about $40/day)
  • UW Student Abroad Insurance ($1.74/day)
  • Other health expenses/immunizations
  • Personal spending money


Payment Due Date: July 6, 2018

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. Check your MyUW Account periodically for due dates.

Financial Aid

  • A large percentage of UW students utilize financial aid to study abroad. Most types of financial aid can be applied to study abroad fees.
  • For UW Tacoma students, you can submit a revision request to increase the amount of aid for the quarter you are studying abroad. These additional funds are usually awarded in the form of loans. To apply, fill out a revision request form, attach the budget sheet (available via the link at the top of this brochure) and submit these documents to the UW Tacoma Office of Financial Aid
  • For UW Seattle or Bothell Students, you can apply by filling out a revision request form, attach the budget sheet (available via the link at the top of this brochure) and submit these documents to the the Office of Financial Aid
  • Consult the Financial Aid section of our website for more information on applying for financial aid, special considerations for summer and early fall programs, and budgeting and fundraising tips.

Scholarships

  • There are many scholarships designed to fund students studying abroad. The UW administers a study abroad scholarship program and there are national awards available as well.
  • Scholarships vary widely in their parameters. Some are need-based, some are location-based, and some are merit-based.
  • For UW Study Abroad Scholarships fill out a short questionnaire on your UW Study Abroad program application to be considered.  You must apply by the priority application deadline for the program in order to be considered for a scholarship.  Click the Overview tab to view application deadlines.
  • UW Tacoma students should consult the Study Abroad Scholarships website to learn more about scholarship opportunities. Student Fellowships can also help you learn about additional opportunities. 
  • UW Seattle or Bothell students should consult the Scholarships page to learn about UW-based and national scholarships. The Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards can help you learn about additional opportunities. 

Budgeting Tools

We understand that figuring out your finances for study abroad can be complicated and we are here to help. Here are some ways to find additional support:

  • Click on the Budget Sheets link at the top of this brochure to view the estimated budget of all expenses for this program.
  • UW Tacoma students can attend a How to Fund Your Study Abroad event - more information is on the Events page of our website. 
  • UW Seattle or Bothell students can attend a Financial Planning Workshop offered by UW Study Abroad – more information is on the Events page of our website. Contact the Global Opportunities Adviser at goglobal@uw.edu to learn more about how to pay for study abroad.
  • Visit the Finances section of our website.

APPLICATION CONSIDERATIONS

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Application Process

The study abroad application includes a personal statement, three short answer questions, one recommendation from a professor or TA, and electronic signature documents related to UW policies and expectations for study abroad. Following the online application process, you may be contacted by the program director for an in-person interview. Once an admission decision has been made regarding your application, you will be notified by the study abroad system via email.

Orientation

To be eligible to study abroad, you must attend an in-person pre-departure orientation facilitated by UW Study Abroad. You must also attend program-specific orientations offered by the program director.

You must register for the UW Study Abroad orientation. You can visit the Orientation section of our website to view the current schedule and to register for an orientation session. Orientations are also held on the UW Tacoma campus.

Orientation must be completed prior to the enrollment deadline for the quarter that you are studying abroad.

Visas

UW Study Abroad is not responsible for obtaining visas for study abroad program participants. The cost and requirements for obtaining visas vary. It is your responsibility to determine visa requirements for all countries you plan to visit while abroad including countries that you plan to visit before or after your study abroad program. This is an especially important consideration if you are planning to do more than one study abroad program. You can research visa requirements by calling the consular offices of those countries or checking the following website: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html.

Note: If you are not a U.S. citizen, consult the embassy or consulate of the countries you will visit to learn their document requirements. You can check the following website to find contact information for the consulate of the country you will be visiting: https://www.state.gov/s/cpr/32122.htm.

For non-U.S. citizens, the procedures that you will need to follow may be different than those for U.S. citizens. It is important to initiate this process as soon as possible in order to assemble documents and allow time for lengthy procedures.

Disability Accommodations

The University of Washington is committed to providing access and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, and education for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodation for this program, contact Disability Resources for Students at least 8 weeks in advance of your departure date. Contact info at disability.uw.edu.

Withdrawals

The $450 UW Study Abroad Fee are non-refundable once a contract has been submitted. Students withdrawing from a program are responsible for paying a percentage of the program fee depending on the date of withdrawal. More details about the withdrawal policy are included in your payment contract. No part of the program fee is refundable once the program has begun. The date of withdrawal is considered the business day a withdrawal form is received by UW Study Abroad. Notice of withdrawal from the program must be made in writing by completing the following steps:

  1. Provide notice in writing to the program director that you will no longer be participating in the program.
  2. Submit a signed withdrawal form to UW Study Abroad.

Visit the Withdrawals section of our website for more information.