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  • Locations: Manila, Philippines
  • Program Terms: Early Fall
  • Budget Sheets: Early Fall
Dates / Deadlines:

There are currently no active application cycles for this program.
Program Information:

Title
QUICK FACTS
Location Manila, Philippines
Academic Term Early Fall
08/21/2019 - 09/12/2019
Estimated Program Fee $2,950
Credits 5
Prerequisites At least two AES courses taken successfully.
Program Directors Rick Bonus | rbonus@uw.edu
Taylor Ahana-Jamille ahanat@uw.edu
Program Manager | studyabroad@uw.edu
Priority Application Deadline February 15, 2019
Information Sessions January 25, 2019 4:00 - 5:30 PM, Schmitz 450
HIGHLIGHTS
General This program will enable students to engage with the impact of the colonization of the Philippines by examining the roles of the country’s former colonizers as well as its local populations. Students will also be provided opportunities to perform service activities to its schools and community centers.
Visas  
 

Program Description

This Early Fall Study Abroad program intends to enable students to practice the application of American Ethnic Studies as a field of study in a country that was previously a colony of the United States -- the Philippines. We will primarily look at two sets of sites to study both the histories and the impact of such colonization: schools and community centers. By an "ethnic studies" framework, we mean exploring schools (particularly, a college institution and its allied elementary and high schools) and sites of community interaction in the Philippines in relationship to issues of social stratification, collective identity formation, and instances of power creation, maintenance, and resistance or transformation. In addition, students will be able to perform such an exploration from a comparative perspective: that of comparing and contrasting schools and community centers in the Philippines with those in the U.S. On site, students will be able to observe and participate in service activities in classroom settings and community project sites. They will be interacting with school offices, teachers, students, community leaders and personnel, along with attending and participating in productive discussion sessions with diverse groups.
 

LOCATION

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Sites

Manila, Philippines

Housing

Student's primary housing will be an apartment building that we utilized before in 3 previous programs. These units are partly owned by our university partner; they are clean, functional, and safe (there is a security guard on the premises 24/7); our partners are reliable and experienced with us.

ACADEMICS

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Prerequisites and Language Requirements

At least two AES (or equivalent) courses taken successfully. No language requirements.

Credits

5 UW Quarter Credits

Courses

AES 498: Postcolonial Education and Collective Work (5 credits) I&S

This summer program trip to the Philippines hopes to enable students to practice the application of American Ethnic Studies as a field of study in a country that was previously a colony of the United States. We will primarily look at two sets of sites to study both the histories and impact of such colonization: schools and community centers. By an ethnic studies framework, we mean exploring schools (particularly, a college institution and its allied elementary and high schools) and sites of community interaction in the Philippines in relationship to issues of social stratification, collective identity formation, and instances of power creation, maintenance, and resistance or transformation. In addition, students will be able to perform such an exploration from a comparative perspective: that of comparing and contrasting schools and community centers in the Philippines with those in the United States. On site, students will be able to observe and participate in activities in college classroom settings, museums, and community project sites. They will be interacting with school officials, teachers, and students, including museum and community personnel, along with attending and participating in discussion sessions with diverse groups. Exploring the Philippines first hand will provide the best experience for students who are especially interested in schooling and community building practices within the contexts of colonization and decolonization. They will be able to compare these with their home country. We will observe how locals engage their histories and contemporary conditions, including their practices of resistance and transformation. And we will also interact with them, learn from them, as much as share with them our own views and practices of struggle in the U.S., all through the perspectives of connected histories and current global realities. Fundamentally, students will hopefully be transformed. They will learn how to practice respect in dealing with difference, sensitivity to other cultures, and open-mindedness when it comes to dealing with practices and thinking that are different from their own. They will have a broader understanding of schooling and community practice in relation to national identity issues in a third world country. The host community, on the other hand, will benefit from the presence and participation of U.S. students through interaction, cultural exchange, and some measure of service that students are expected to perform. This includes participating in a class project with Filipino students at the Philippine Women's University in Manila.

Learning goals include:
The primary goal of this course is to enable students to comprehend the connections across ethnic studies, education, and community work by examining the following items: the historical and contemporary contexts within which Philippine schools are organized, the roles of education in their society, the social construction of curricula especially with regard to remembering colonization, diverse schooling experiences of different students, and the ongoing debates about national identity and difference in the Philippines -- all as compared with the U.S. Beyond comprehending these connections, students will learn multiple ways of engaging with them: through community service, conversations and interactions with locals, the performance of collective work with community and school workers, and through personal and collective reflection and evaluation exercises. Overall, students will learn how to be critical thinkers and doers, as well as agents of social transformation, in local and global contexts. They will be encouraged to be reflective of and creative with different ways we can approach history, culture, difference, and power across unequal settings.

 



 

 


 

 


 

PROGRAM LEADERSHIP

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Rick Bonus
Associate Professor of American Ethnic Studies, Director of the Diversity Minor Program, American Ethnic Studies


rbonus@uw.edu

Taylor Ahana-Jamille
Operations Specialist, Study Abroad / Office of Global Affairs


ahanat@uw.edu

 

 

FINANCES

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Program Expenses

Estimated Program Fee: $2,950

Included in the program fee:

  • $450 Study Abroad Fee
  • Instruction
  • Housing
  • Program activities and program travel
Not included in the program fee:
  • Airfare (average price subject to when and where your buy your ticket - $1,100)
  • Food (about $6.00/day)
  • UW Student Abroad Insurance ($1.64/day)
  • Other health expenses/immunizations
  • Personal spending money


Payment Due Date: October 11, 2019

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. Check your MyUW Account periodically for due dates.

Financial Aid

  • A large percentage of UW students utilize financial aid to study abroad. Most types of financial aid can be applied to study abroad fees.
  • You can submit a revision request to increase the amount of aid for the quarter you are studying abroad. These additional funds are usually awarded in the form of loans. To apply, fill out a revision request form, attach the budget sheet (available via the link at the top of this brochure) and submit these documents to the Office of Student Financial Aid.  For more information about this process, consult the Financial Aid section of our website.
  • Consult the Financial Aid section of our website for more information on applying for financial aid, special considerations for summer and early fall programs, and budgeting and fundraising tips.

Scholarships

  • There are many scholarships designed to fund students studying abroad. The UW Study Abroad administers a study abroad scholarship program and there are national awards available as well.
  • Scholarships vary widely in their parameters. Some are need-based, some are location-based, and some are merit-based.
  • To be considered for a UW Study Abroad Scholarship fill out a short questionnaire on your UW Study Abroad program application.  You must apply by the priority application deadline for the program in order to be considered for a scholarship.  Click the Overview tab to view application deadlines.
  • Consult our Scholarships page to learn about UW-based and national scholarships. The Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards can help you learn about additional opportunities.

Budgeting Tools

We understand that figuring out your finances for study abroad can be complicated and we are here to help. Below are some ways to find additional support.

  • Click on the Budget Sheets link at the top of this brochure to view the estimated budget of all expenses for this program.
  • Contact the Global Opportunities Adviser at goglobal@uw.edu to learn more about how to pay for study abroad.
  • Attend a Financial Planning Workshop offered by UW Study Abroad – more information is on the Events page of our website.
  • Visit the Finances section of our website.

APPLICATION CONSIDERATIONS

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Application Process

The study abroad application includes a personal statement, three short answer questions, one recommendation from a professor or TA, and electronic signature documents related to UW policies and expectations for study abroad. Following the online application process, you may be contacted by the program director for an in-person interview. Once an admission decision has been made regarding your application, you will be notified by the study abroad system via email.

Orientation

To be eligible to study abroad, you must complete the mandatory pre-departure online orientation provided by UW Study Abroad. You must also attend program-specific orientations offered by the program director.

You will be able to access the online orientation through your study abroad application once you have been accepted to a program. Orientation must be completed prior to the enrollment deadline for the quarter that you are studying abroad.

Visas

UW Study Abroad is not responsible for obtaining visas for study abroad program participants. The cost and requirements for obtaining visas vary. It is your responsibility to determine visa requirements for all countries you plan to visit while abroad including countries that you plan to visit before or after your study abroad program. This is an especially important consideration if you are planning to do more than one study abroad program. You can research visa requirements by calling the consular offices of those countries or checking the following website: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html.

Note: If you are not a U.S. citizen, consult the embassy or consulate of the countries you will visit to learn their document requirements. You can check the following website to find contact information for the consulate of the country you will be visiting: https://www.state.gov/s/cpr/32122.htm.

For non-U.S. citizens, the procedures that you will need to follow may be different than those for U.S. citizens. It is important to initiate this process as soon as possible in order to assemble documents and allow time for lengthy procedures.

Disability Accommodations

The University of Washington is committed to providing access and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, and education for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodation for this program, contact Disability Resources for Students at least 8 weeks in advance of your departure date. Contact info at disability.uw.edu.

Withdrawals

$350 of the total program fee and the $450 UW Study Abroad Fee are non-refundable once you have submitted a contract. Students withdrawing from a program are responsible for paying a percentage of the program fee depending on the date of withdrawal. More details about the withdrawal policy will be included in your payment contract. No part of the program fee is refundable once the program has begun. The date of withdrawal is considered the business day a withdrawal application is received by UW Study Abroad. Notice of withdrawal from the program must be made in writing by completing the following steps:

  1. Provide notice in writing to the program director that you will no longer be participating in the program.
  2. Submit a withdrawal application to UW Study Abroad.

Visit the Withdrawals section of our website for more information.