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Program Information:

Title
QUICK FACTS
Location Manila, Philippines; Banaue, Philippines; Cebu, Philippines
Academic Term Summer B-Term
07/24/2019 - 08/22/2019
Estimated Program Fee $6,250
Credits 12
Prerequisites All students are highly encouraged to register for HSTCMP 205A/SISE 205: Introduction to Filipino Histories during Summer A term, unless they have already taken this course. In addition, students will need to have successfully completed at least one of, or something comparable to, the following courses: CHID 250: Critical Community Organizing HONORS 394: Archiving and Hip Hop in the 206 AAS 360: Filipino American History and Culture AAS 101: Introduction to Asian American Cultures AAS 206: Asian American Contemporary Issues AAS 210: Asian American Identity AES150: Introductory History of American Ethnic Groups AES 151: Introduction to Cultures of American Ethnic Groups AES 340: Race, Ethnicity, and Education CHID 260 (Re) Thinking Diversity CHID 250: Hip Hop in the 206 CHID 250: Hollywood: The portrayal of minority groups in the motion film industry CHID 250: Hip Hop culture, music, and videos GWSS 200: Introduction to Women Studies GWSS 300/AES 322: Race, Class, Gender
Program Directors Third Andresen | redrum@uw.edu
Vicente Rafael | vrafael@uw.edu
Program Manager Darielle Horsey | studyabroad@uw.edu
Priority Application Deadline January 31, 2019
Extended Application Deadline February 15, 2019
Information Sessions TBD - Please contact program directors for more information
HIGHLIGHTS
General This program will examine the United States' occupation of the Philippines and its implications on current as well as historical Filipino identity construction.
   
 

Program Description

This program will examine the United States' occupation of the Philippines and its implications on current as well as historical Filipino identity construction. Exploring historical texts, western and indigenous theory, art, Hip Hop culture, and local travel, we will ask how Filipino identities are negotiated and what it means to live in the islands. The utilization of English as the primary means of education in the Philippines during the colonial era and the invisibility of Filipino contributions in the U.S. are some of the many issues we will consider. Specifically, we will engage the work of Filipino and Filipino American scholars and community members who assert that the colonial mentality created by the effects of 300-year Spanish colonization and American educational policy in the Philippines from 1898 to 1945 has impacted Filipinos as they learned to become Westernized and behave like Americans, speak Americanized English, emulate American culture, and absorbed American democratic procedures. Although we will connect the Spanish influence in the Philippines and its impact on Filipino society and identity, this program will primarily focus on the role of American colonization, occupation, and education policies on Filipino identity formation. The Philippines is an important site for studying the history of US colonialism because the archipelago was a territory of the United States for half a century. More specifically, focusing on the implementation of American education policy in the Philippines will help students consider the ways education policy at this time was part of a larger campaign of military colonial control. The program will be located at the University of the Philippines in Quezon City, part of Megalopolis Manila. One of the many unique values of this site selection is that it will allow our students to engage first-hand with Filipino citizens on the very topics we are studying. Interacting with the students, faculty, and community from the University of the Philippines in Quezon City will allow UW students to see the vestiges of American colonialism as the outcome of this military colonial control and ideology within everyday life. Furthermore, the students' examination of this particular period in American history will allow them to make connections with how the outcome of United States jurisdiction implemented in the Philippines is still seen into the present-day. This course will also broaden students' framework and concept of civic engagement by working with community-based organizations in the Philippines. We will also utilize the site for gathering evidence and examples of lasting Spanish legacy and American presence in the Philippines. While the program will be located and anchored at the University of the Philippines in Quezon City, the Program Directors, local scholars, educators, and community organizers will teach the course both in Seattle and in Manila, beginning with a highly recommended five-credit UW Summer course, Introduction to Filipino Histories (HSTCMP 205), cross-listed as SISE 205A and weekly pre-departure meetings during Summer Quarter A Term 2019. This course can also be taken in the Autumn of 2018. Students will then build upon this foundation in this 12-credit program during Summer B-Term 2019 in the Philippines. Incorporated into the curriculum will be a collaborative project that has a strong emphasis on direct community involvement. While the program specifically will be utilizing the knowledge and skills of our local coordinators, students will have the opportunity to focus their projects on other aspects of Filipino society that have been pre-approved by the program directors.
 

LOCATION

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Sites

Manila, Philippines; Banaue, Philippines; Cebu, Philippines

Housing

Residence hall at the University of the Philippines.

ACADEMICS

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Prerequisites and Language Requirements

All students are highly encouraged to register for HSTCMP 205A/SISE 205: Introduction to Filipino Histories during Summer A term, unless they have already taken this course. In addition, students will need to have successfully completed at least one of, or something comparable to, the following courses: CHID 250: Critical Community Organizing HONORS 394: Archiving and Hip Hop in the 206 AAS 360: Filipino American History and Culture AAS 101: Introduction to Asian American Cultures AAS 206: Asian American Contemporary Issues AAS 210: Asian American Identity AES150: Introductory History of American Ethnic Groups AES 151: Introduction to Cultures of American Ethnic Groups AES 340: Race, Ethnicity, and Education CHID 260 (Re) Thinking Diversity CHID 250: Hip Hop in the 206 CHID 250: Hollywood: The portrayal of minority groups in the motion film industry CHID 250: Hip Hop culture, music, and videos GWSS 200: Introduction to Women Studies GWSS 300/AES 322: Race, Class, Gender.

It is highly recommended that participants physically and mentally prepare for the considerable amount of trekking. For example, navigating Megalapolis Manila via Jeepney, Light Rail, Taxi Cab, Tricycle, Uber, and Bus, and island hopping via catamaran and ferry throughout the duration of the program. Additionally, during Week 1, students will be expected to participate in Filipino Martial Arts training and demonstration.

Credits

12 UW Quarter Credits

Courses

CHID 476 A: The Empire is in the Heart: Colonial Legacies and Conditions in the Philippines (5 credits) I&S

What does it mean to inherit a colonial legacy? How is a past bedeviled by foreign occupation come to shape a present steeped in political and economic inequality, racial hierarchies, gendered and sexualized disparities? What are the counter-legacies of resistance, revolution, as well as counter-revolution and capitulation that accompany this history? In this course, we will be traveling through the Philippines and dwelling, for however brief a time, among a people and a place where these questions are a daily reality, consumed alongside political debates, educational policies, and popular culture. They seep into the broken pavements and stalled traffic of unequal development, the everyday discourse about the corruption of authorities, the earnest organizing of grassroots organization, the gossip, the rumors, and the laughter that burst and swirl from city to countryside. We will explore the concrete crowdedness of Metro Manila, the museums, the churches and the universities, the malls and the streets where the grit and promise of development are deposited in the very milieu and languages of the people. We will also travel to the northern areas of fabled rice terraces and a former colonial hill station, where indigenous people's claims still hold sway, while exploring the extraordinary beauty of provincial towns and coastal beaches that are simultaneously endangered by touristic development and capitalist pressures coming from corporate mining and logging interests. We will reflect on how the current forces of globalization have long impinged on the diverse societies of this archipelagic country, sending Filipinos to work and immigrate overseas, spurring sex and labor trafficking, forcing indigenous peoples off their land, creating vast gaps between the rich and the poor. Talking with academic experts (at Philippine Women's University, the University of the Philippines at the Ateneo de Manila University), political officials, journalists, local leaders, students and grass-roots organizations, we will also learn about the diverse ways by which people have responded to these unrelenting challenges, re-working the colonial inheritance into the very conditions from which they seek to escape and overturn its grip. In this regard, students will also have a chance to learn the traditional fighting form of the Arnis, reputedly used in anti-colonial wars. Finally, students will seek to reckon with the place, or lack of it, of Filipino Americans in the Philippines, and how this is reflected in their own ambivalent and ambiguous positions in the United States and elsewhere. By learning through traveling and living in the country, students can thus hope to develop a more comparative and compassionate understanding of the twinned histories and shared futures of the Philippines and the United States.

Learning goals include:
To identify local sources of knowledge and Philippines perspectives. Students will be expected to be out and about in the local communities paying particular attention to the knowledges of the place while negotiating it into their knowledges brought from home. A rubric will be designed to measure students' progress and will be used to asses their Weekly Reflection Paper/BLOG The criteria for this rubric will be: 1) Engage conversation with someone we met along the way that is not part of our program. 2) Write about how folks' experiences connect to the readings and class discussions. 3) Describe the feeling and the significance of participating in the program activities. 4) To the extent to which the blog entry incorporates the ALL readings, discussions, and lectures completed in class. 5) To the extent which the blog provides a critical analysis, interpretation, and synthesis of the readings and local interactions.

CHID 476 B: Made in the USA: American Occupation, Identity Construction, and Social Action (5 credits) I&S, Diversity

Filipino American scholars and community members posit that cultural psychological captivity or colonial mentality created by the effects of American educational policy in the Philippines affected the self-concepts of Filipinos as they learned to behave like Americans, speak Americanized English, emulate American culture, and absorbed American democratic procedures. The utilization of English as the primary language of education in the Philippines during the colonial era and the invisibility of Filipino experiences and contributions in American history is said to be one of many issues surrounding Filipino identity today. While English continues to be the lingua franca of business, government, and much of the middle class, to what extent does it still continue to exercise hegemony in the midst of a steady push to use mother tongues and the national language, Filipino, in K-12 education and most importantly, in popular culture? Can we still characterize Filipino culture as "mis-educated," or is it time to get rid of this outmoded, post-war and largely elitist concept for conceptualizing the rabidly hybrid and vertiginously inventive nature of Filipino cultures? Students will have the opportunity to explore a wide variety of sites. They will visit with Non-governmental organizations and government officials alike dealing with problems such as human trafficking, electoral reform, labor issues and women's rights; major academic institutions and important historical sites; former US military bases (which even now are being refashioned to house visiting US forces on a regular basis) as well as shelters and organizations that aid sex trade workers and their children of around these former bases; museums and government centers, shuttling between the horrific, mind-numbing traffic of Manila and the wide-open spaces of country roads and beaches. We will engage with local organizations such as Migrante and Gabriela Network, which are actively involved in awareness campaigns to prevent the trafficking of women and girls from the Philippines and workers' basic human rights. Students will also have the opportunity to collaborate with former Washington State Representative Velma Veloria, and Ms. Lila Shihani who is also the Spokesperson of the Advocacy and Communications Group of the Inter-Agency Council Against (Human) Trafficking (IACAT). Washington's Task Force Against Trafficking of Persons reports that Washington state is a source for the recruitment, transportation and sale of people for labor. The report indicates several factors such as the international border with Canada, abundance of ports, vast rural areas, and Dependency on agricultural workers make Washington State prone to human trafficking. Seattle is part of a trafficking circuit that included Honolulu, Las Vegas, New Orleans, Portland, Vancouver (Clark County), Yakima and Canada. The report also notes that trafficking has occurred in 18 Washington state counties. Victims range from "mail-order" brides to sex trade workers to domestic workers and children. Local victims have come from Russia, the Philippines, China and Mexico. In 2003, Representative Veloria and her colleagues introduced the first Anti-Trafficking Bill in the United States to criminalize human trafficking. We will also engage with BAYAN, which is a predominantly youth-based national democratic movement in the Philippines comprising over one million members. BAYAN conducts education campaigns on the country's basic problems and how to solve them in ways that are democratic and people-oriented. Moreover, BAYAN initiates and/or promotes socio-economic relief and rehabilitation projects in support and defense of the democratic rights of citizens marginalized by militarization and natural and man-made calamities, especially among the peasants and national minorities in the countryside.

Learning goals include:
Students will investigate, analyze and determine biases, frames of reference, perspectives, and cultural assumptions in collaboration with students in the Philippines regarding knowledge construction that is interpreted, learned, and internalized. Students will examine the legacy of American educational policies, which center on Western cultural-historical perspectives, and its effect on the way Filipinos are perceived and identified in the United States and abroad. Students will analyze primary documents from a variety of perspectives to gain an understanding of contemporary arguments for and against U.S. annexation of the Philippines at the turn of the twentieth century. The students will focus on and develop their understanding of culture, race, class and gender into a new globalized U.S. history.A rubric will be designed and used to assess and measure students' progress. A rubric will be designed to measure students' progress and will be used to asses their Weekly Reflection Paper/BLOG, Group Reading Presentation, and Final Reflection paper/BLOG The criteria will be: To the extent the blog clearly depicts ideas relating to Philippines Study Abroad Program 2) To the extent to which the blog clearly defined the topic consistently developed throughout. 3) To the extent to which the blog entry incorporates the ALL readings, discussions, and lectures completed in class. 4) To the extent which the blog provides a critical analysis, interpretation, and synthesis of the readings and local interactions. 5) To the extent, which the blog drew upon cite and uses important research theories related to the topic of Philippine colonization. 6) To the extent to which your claims are argued logically and supported with research, theory, and or the established opinions of scholars and experts in the field. 7) To the extent to which the blogger cite and give credit for the ideas of other authors and researchers that are incorporated in the presentation (Bibliography and APA/MLA format). 8) To the extent to which the blog shows videos or pictures that demonstrates the topic, the blogger highlights. 9) To the extent to which the blog has at least 1 question to discuss related to your topic. 10) To the extent to which the blog are at least 500 words.

CHID 470: Engaged Community Learning in the Philippines (Island Hopping) (2 credits) VLPA, Diversity

Students in this course will investigate how indigenous and non-indigenous Filipinos respond to the legacy of American colonization and the living conditions it created through community organizing. We will attend events, conferences, meetings, and discussions that reflect the discourse, legacy, and the implications of American colonization. This course will also broaden students' framework and concept of civic engagement from community based organizations in the Philippines. This course will allow students a great opportunity to explore these vexed issues of colonial legacies, new post-colonial formations, hybrid identities, and class-inflected struggles over cultural politics, governmentality, and economic relations. Students will see first hand the massive transformations that take place among the varied peoples of the archipelago, traversed by uneven capitalist development, wrought by the differing impact of Spanish, US and Japanese colonial rule, as well as the control of the nation's capital, "imperial Manila." Students will also have the opportunity to visit various areas of the country that show the diverse responses of peoples faced with the contemporary pressures of globalization: from indigenous peoples confronted by threats from mining, logging and tourism industry to the multitude of poor inhabitants in informal settlements that wrap themselves around the gleaming skyscrapers and air-conditioned shopping malls of the major cities. The course will rely on a combination of academic readings and discussions, as well as field trips to important U.S. and Spanish colonial sites such as Baguio City, Mactan Island, Negros Island, Cebu Island, Bohol Island, and Boracay Island. The students in this course will have the opportunity to engage with Filipino citizens about the topic of American occupation and the vestiges of colonialism as the outcome of this ideology on everyday life. Furthermore, the students will be able to observe academic curricula such as "KAS 205: Commonwealth of the Philippines" and "KAS 226: US Policies in the Philippines" at the University of the Philippines, Ateneo de Manila, Silliman University, Taguig City University, and Philippine Women's University. Participation in these courses will allow them to make connections on the outcome of United States jurisdictions implemented in the Philippines.

Learning goals include:
Students will have the opportunity to travel to various areas of the country and engage with the locals in order to recognize the value of differing points of perception created by aspects of gender, ethnicity, nationality, and class. Students will investigate how indigenous and non-indigenous Filipinos respond to the legacy of American colonization/exceptionalism and the living conditions it created through community organizing, arts, music, and education. Students, particularly American students of color, will have the opportunity to dialogue and draw comparisons on how Filipino students negotiate in the continuous pursuit of reconstructing their identity. A rubric will be designed and used to asses and measure students' progress. A rubric will be designed to measure students' progress and will be used to assess their community engagement project and network building skill set. The three criteria for this rubric will be 1) Engage conversation with someone we met along the way that is not part of our program. Write about how folks' experiences connect to the readings. 2) Reflect on their own ethnic identity; what did they think about what it means to be a Filipino American before and after participating in this program 3) Focus on one particular place expand on their topic and incorporate the readings.

 


 

PROGRAM LEADERSHIP

Compass

Third Andresen
Part Time Lecturer, Comparative History of Ideas


redrum@uw.edu

Vicente Rafael
Professor, History


vrafael@uw.edu

 

 

FINANCES

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Program Expenses

Estimated Program Fee: $6,250

Included in the program fee:

  • $450 Study Abroad Fee
  • $350 CHID Fee
  • Instruction
  • Housing
  • Program activities and program travel
Not included in the program fee:
  • Airfare (average price subject to when and where your buy your ticket - $1,400)
  • Food (about $20/day)
  • UW Student Abroad Insurance ($1.64/day)
  • Other health expenses/immunizations
  • Personal spending money


Payment Due Date: August 9, 2019

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. Check your MyUW Account periodically for due dates.

Financial Aid

  • A large percentage of UW students utilize financial aid to study abroad. Most types of financial aid can be applied to study abroad fees.
  • You can submit a revision request to increase the amount of aid for the quarter you are studying abroad. These additional funds are usually awarded in the form of loans. To apply, fill out a revision request form, attach the budget sheet (available via the link at the top of this brochure) and submit these documents to the Office of Student Financial Aid.  For more information about this process, consult the Financial Aid section of our website.
  • Consult the Financial Aid section of our website for more information on applying for financial aid, special considerations for summer and early fall programs, and budgeting and fundraising tips.

Scholarships

  • There are many scholarships designed to fund students studying abroad. The UW Study Abroad administers a study abroad scholarship program and there are national awards available as well.
  • Scholarships vary widely in their parameters. Some are need-based, some are location-based, and some are merit-based.
  • To be considered for a UW Study Abroad Scholarship fill out a short questionnaire on your UW Study Abroad program application.  You must apply by the priority application deadline for the program in order to be considered for a scholarship.  Click the Overview tab to view application deadlines.
  • Consult our Scholarships page to learn about UW-based and national scholarships. The Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards can help you learn about additional opportunities.

Budgeting Tools

We understand that figuring out your finances for study abroad can be complicated and we are here to help. Below are some ways to find additional support.

  • Click on the Budget Sheets link at the top of this brochure to view the estimated budget of all expenses for this program.
  • Contact the Global Opportunities Adviser at goglobal@uw.edu to learn more about how to pay for study abroad.
  • Attend a Financial Planning Workshop offered by UW Study Abroad – more information is on the Events page of our website.
  • Visit the Finances section of our website.

APPLICATION CONSIDERATIONS

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Application Process

The study abroad application includes a personal statement, three short answer questions, one recommendation from a professor or TA, and electronic signature documents related to UW policies and expectations for study abroad. Following the online application process, you may be contacted by the program director for an in-person interview. Once an admission decision has been made regarding your application, you will be notified by the study abroad system via email.

Orientation

To be eligible to study abroad, you must complete the mandatory pre-departure online orientation provided by UW Study Abroad. You must also attend program-specific orientations offered by the program director.
You will be able to access the online orientation through your study abroad application once you have been accepted to a program. Orientation must be completed prior to the enrollment deadline for the quarter that you are studying abroad.

Visas

UW Study Abroad is not responsible for obtaining visas for study abroad program participants. The cost and requirements for obtaining visas vary. It is your responsibility to determine visa requirements for all countries you plan to visit while abroad including countries that you plan to visit before or after your study abroad program. This is an especially important consideration if you are planning to do more than one study abroad program. You can research visa requirements by calling the consular offices of those countries or checking the following website: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html.

Note: If you are not a U.S. citizen, consult the embassy or consulate of the countries you will visit to learn their document requirements. You can check the following website to find contact information for the consulate of the country you will be visiting: https://www.state.gov/s/cpr/32122.htm.

For non-U.S. citizens, the procedures that you will need to follow may be different than those for U.S. citizens. It is important to initiate this process as soon as possible in order to assemble documents and allow time for lengthy procedures.

Disability Accommodations

The University of Washington is committed to providing access and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, and education for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodation for this program, contact Disability Resources for Students at least 8 weeks in advance of your departure date. Contact info at disability.uw.edu.

Withdrawals

$350 of the total program fee and the $450 UW Study Abroad Fee are non-refundable once you have submitted a contract. Students withdrawing from a program are responsible for paying a percentage of the program fee depending on the date of withdrawal. More details about the withdrawal policy will be included in your payment contract. No part of the program fee is refundable once the program has begun. The date of withdrawal is considered the business day a withdrawal application is received by UW Study Abroad. Notice of withdrawal from the program must be made in writing by completing the following steps:

  1. Provide notice in writing to the program director that you will no longer be participating in the program.
  2. Submit a withdrawal application to UW Study Abroad.

Visit the Withdrawals section of our website for more information.