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  • Locations: Tahiti, Tahiti
  • Program Terms: Early Fall
  • Budget Sheets: Early Fall
Dates / Deadlines:

There are currently no active application cycles for this program.
Program Information:

Title
QUICK FACTS
Location Papeete, French Polynesia
Academic Term Early Fall
08/24/2019 - 09/21/2019
Estimated Program Fee $4,850
Credits 5
Prerequisites The course does not have specific prerequisites. However, we are looking to recruit students who are open-minded, positive, and eager to learn in a new and challenging environment. Students who are excited about experiential learning in a global context are ideal candidates for this program. Students from diverse backgrounds are highly encouraged to apply.
Program Directors Gabriel Gallardo | gabegms@uw.edu
Chris Rothschild chriskr@uw.edu
Program Manager <> | studyabroad@uw.edu
Priority Application Deadline February 15, 2019
Information Sessions TBD - Please contact program directors for more information
HIGHLIGHTS
General (Please provide one to two sentences describing the program)
Visas This country is part of the Schengen area. Note that there are strict rules and restrictions for foreign visitors to this area that may impact a student's ability to travel within the region before or after their program, or to attend two subsequent programs in this area. It is critical that the student reviews the information and scenarios here to learn more about Schengen area visa requirements.
 

Program Description

French Polynesia, and the island of Tahiti in particular, is an ideal site for exploring issues of "wayfiding" through the lens of place and identity, while engaging with Tahiti's long and rich culture of oral traditions. The islands in the region play a central role as the mythical hearth of Polynesian culture and as the source of the diffusion of Polynesian peoples (Diaspora) to islands across the Pacific. Drawing on Ma'ohi indigenous cultural identity and connection to land (Fenua), and delving into their traditional knowledge systems, we will engage students in an exploration that traces both the historical, geographic, and mythical frameworks that shape our understanding of the key role that the region has played in the Diaspora of Polynesian people across the Pacific. An important element of this program focuses on understanding the different systems of oral traditions and how to understand information they contain. The focus will be on Tahiti and the Pacific islands and we will attempt to help students understand the value of oral traditions as valid, critical, and credible sources of scientific information and not just cultural "stories". This course explores key issues around identity and place, cultural diffusion, and notions of community in the context of Tahiti, French Polynesia through understanding different systems of knowledge. The course content is interdisciplinary in nature and draws on scholarship from information science, geography, history, and anthropology to help students understand the cultural, social, and economic realities of this island society. Reading materials include authors from Polynesia and other regions of the world to add a comparative and cross-cultural perspective such as observing/participating in local festivals and dance competitions; participating in local athletic events; visiting ancient places of worship; and interacting directly with a variety of Tahitian residents) will also broaden students' understanding of the Polynesian culture and world history. In addition, a Tahitian language component designed to augment the cultural immersion of students into Tahitian life will be a rich pedagogical element that will enhance learning. The pace of life in Tahiti is generally much slower than in the US, which may test students' sense of timing and expectations of people with which they interact. We anticipate that the cultural and the learning experience will not be one-sided. The host-communities with which the students will be engaged will also benefit from the perspectives and lifestyles of participating students. We expect communities to also appreciate the interest that our students show in the local culture and language, and that the communities will be left with a lasting positive impression about visitors from the US.
 

LOCATION

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Sites

Papeete, French Polynesia

Housing

The students' primary housing is a compound that is leased by the local Tahitian coordinator. This location has served as the main housing facility since 2011 and is suitable for the needs of the program. For example, the students will share a large house that is equipped with multiple bathrooms, a kitchen, living room space, and outdoor patio. Electricity and potable water are included. The vendor accepts wire transfers for payments.

ACADEMICS

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Prerequisites and Language Requirements

The course does not have specific prerequisites. However, we are looking to recruit students who are open-minded, positive, and eager to learn in a new and challenging environment. Students who are excited about experiential learning in a global context are ideal candidates for this program. Students from diverse backgrounds are highly encouraged to apply. The program includes excursions to remote places that require moderate hiking through rough terrain. Water activities (e.g., swimming, canoeing, and sailing) are integral to the experience, so students will spend time in and around the ocean and local rivers.

Credits

5 UW Quarter Credits

Courses

INFO 498: Special Topics in Informatics (4 credits) Individuals and Society, Diversity

This course explores key issues around identity and place, cultural diffusion, and notions of community in the context of Tahiti, French Polynesia through understanding different systems of knowledge. The course content is interdisciplinary in nature and draws on scholarship from information science, geography, history, and anthropology to help students understand the cultural, social, and economic realities of this island society. Reading materials include authors from Polynesia and other regions of the world to add a comparative and cross-cultural framework. Through lectures, readings, discussions, the writing process, and field work in the context of Tahiti that draws on the expertise of local residents and contributors, students will develop an understanding of "wayfinding" through the lens of place and identity and critically examine traditional knowledge systems. Students will also have an opportunity to learn the Tahitian language through a course module provided by a Tahitian instructor.

Learning goals include:
The course has three key learning objectives: First, students will learn and engage in discussions around the themes of identity and place, cultural diffusion, and notions of community drawn from interdisciplinary scholarship and place-based experience to understand the salient features of contemporary Tahiti. Second, students will gain an understanding of traditional knowledge systems, the types of information they contain, and how they are used and viewed by both Polynesians and Western scientists. Finally, through lectures, readings, discussions, the writing process, and field engagement, the class seeks to help students develop their critical thinking and writing skills. A strong emphasis on self-reflection through 1) daily journal writing and other creative activities (50%); 2) active engagement in field trips and other excursions (25%); and 3) a 10-15 page reflective essay on the social, cultural, and academic aspects of the Tahitian experience.

GEN ST 391: Independent Study (1 credits) VLPA

This course will offer students an opportunity to develop a final project that focuses on their experiences and understanding of identity and place, oral traditions, cultural diffusion, and notions of community in the context of French Polynesia. Each participant will produce an essay that will serve as capstone project for participants of the 2018 Tahiti Study Abroad Program.

Learning goals include:
Each student will be expected to produce a high quality, reflective (5-7 page) essay that focuses on one of the themes of the course. The assessment framework will include: quality of writing; depth of engagement with course themes; and inclusion of bibliography.

 


 

 


 

PROGRAM LEADERSHIP

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Gabriel Gallardo
Professional Staff/Affiliate Assistant Professor, OMA&D


gabegms@uw.edu

Chris Rothschild
Research Scientist, Information School


chriskr@uw.edu

Andres Huante
Professional Staff

 

FINANCES

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Program Expenses

Estimated Program Fee: $4,850

Included in the program fee:

  • $450 Study Abroad Fee
  • Instruction
  • Housing
  • Program activities and program travel
Not included in the program fee:
  • Airfare (average price subject to when and where your buy your ticket - $2,000)
  • Food (about $10/day)
  • UW Student Abroad Insurance ($1.64/day)
  • Other health expenses/immunizations
  • Personal spending money


Payment Due Date: October 11, 2019

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. Check your MyUW Account periodically for due dates.

Financial Aid

  • A large percentage of UW students utilize financial aid to study abroad. Most types of financial aid can be applied to study abroad fees.
  • You can submit a revision request to increase the amount of aid for the quarter you are studying abroad. These additional funds are usually awarded in the form of loans. To apply, fill out a revision request form, attach the budget sheet (available via the link at the top of this brochure) and submit these documents to the Office of Student Financial Aid.  For more information about this process, consult the Financial Aid section of our website.
  • Consult the Financial Aid section of our website for more information on applying for financial aid, special considerations for summer and early fall programs, and budgeting and fundraising tips.

Scholarships

  • There are many scholarships designed to fund students studying abroad. The UW Study Abroad administers a study abroad scholarship program and there are national awards available as well.
  • Scholarships vary widely in their parameters. Some are need-based, some are location-based, and some are merit-based.
  • To be considered for a UW Study Abroad Scholarship fill out a short questionnaire on your UW Study Abroad program application.  You must apply by the priority application deadline for the program in order to be considered for a scholarship.  Click the Overview tab to view application deadlines.
  • Consult our Scholarships page to learn about UW-based and national scholarships. The Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards can help you learn about additional opportunities.

Budgeting Tools

We understand that figuring out your finances for study abroad can be complicated and we are here to help. Below are some ways to find additional support.

  • Click on the Budget Sheets link at the top of this brochure to view the estimated budget of all expenses for this program.
  • Contact the Global Opportunities Adviser at goglobal@uw.edu to learn more about how to pay for study abroad.
  • Attend a Financial Planning Workshop offered by UW Study Abroad – more information is on the Events page of our website.
  • Visit the Finances section of our website.

APPLICATION CONSIDERATIONS

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Application Process

The study abroad application includes a personal statement, three short answer questions, one recommendation from a professor or TA, and electronic signature documents related to UW policies and expectations for study abroad. Following the online application process, you may be contacted by the program director for an in-person interview. Once an admission decision has been made regarding your application, you will be notified by the study abroad system via email.

Orientation

To be eligible to study abroad, you must complete the mandatory pre-departure online orientation provided by UW Study Abroad. You must also attend program-specific orientations offered by the program director.

You will be able to access the online orientation through your study abroad application once you have been accepted to a program. Orientation must be completed prior to the enrollment deadline for the quarter that you are studying abroad.

Visas

UW Study Abroad is not responsible for obtaining visas for study abroad program participants. The cost and requirements for obtaining visas vary. It is your responsibility to determine visa requirements for all countries you plan to visit while abroad including countries that you plan to visit before or after your study abroad program. This is an especially important consideration if you are planning to do more than one study abroad program. You can research visa requirements by calling the consular offices of those countries or checking the following website: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html.

Note: If you are not a U.S. citizen, consult the embassy or consulate of the countries you will visit to learn their document requirements. You can check the following website to find contact information for the consulate of the country you will be visiting: https://www.state.gov/s/cpr/32122.htm.

For non-U.S. citizens, the procedures that you will need to follow may be different than those for U.S. citizens. It is important to initiate this process as soon as possible in order to assemble documents and allow time for lengthy procedures.

Disability Accommodations

The University of Washington is committed to providing access and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, and education for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodation for this program, contact Disability Resources for Students at least 8 weeks in advance of your departure date. Contact info at disability.uw.edu.

Withdrawals

$350 of the total program fee and the $450 UW Study Abroad Fee are non-refundable once you have submitted a contract. Students withdrawing from a program are responsible for paying a percentage of the program fee depending on the date of withdrawal. More details about the withdrawal policy will be included in your payment contract. No part of the program fee is refundable once the program has begun. The date of withdrawal is considered the business day a withdrawal application is received by UW Study Abroad. Notice of withdrawal from the program must be made in writing by completing the following steps:

  1. Provide notice in writing to the program director that you will no longer be participating in the program.
  2. Submit a withdrawal application to UW Study Abroad.

Visit the Withdrawals section of our website for more information.

Additional Info