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  • Locations: Rome, Italy
  • Program Terms: Winter Quarter
  • Budget Sheets: Winter Quarter
Dates / Deadlines:

There are currently no active application cycles for this program.
Program Information:

Title
QUICK FACTS
Location Rome, Italy
Academic Term Winter Quarter
01/06/2020 - 03/13/2020
Estimated Program Fee $8,300
Credits 15
Prerequisites Only Jackson School students are eligible for Task Force will be admitted. Selection within the Jackson School will be based on (1) major, (2) class standing, (3) GPA, (4) letters of recommendation, (5) reasons for wanting to participate in this particular program, (6) ability to adapt to new situations, (7) willingness to work with others, (8) interview.
Program Directors Clark W. Sorensen | sangok@uw.edu
Marie Anchordoguy anchor@uw.edu
Program Manager Katherine R Kroeger | studyabroad@uw.edu
Priority Application Deadline May 15, 2019
Extended Application Deadline June 3, 2019
Information Sessions May 7th, 11:30 - 12:30pm, Thomson Hall 403
HIGHLIGHTS
General Two task force projects: one on Chinese trade and investment in Europe, and the other on the possibility of a common European policy on migration will be combined with two other classes related to migration and international business and political economy.
Visas This country is part of the Schengen area. Note that there are strict rules and restrictions for foreign visitors to this area that may impact a student's ability to travel within the region before or after their program, or to attend two subsequent programs in this area. It is critical that the student reviews the information and scenarios here to learn more about Schengen area visa requirements.
 

Program Description

This program will be the fourth offering of the Jackson School's 'Task Force Study Abroad' Program in Rome, first held in Winter 2017. The Task Force has been the senior capstone course of the International Studies major at the Jackson School since 1983. Graduating seniors conduct research and writing on current global challenges and international issues, working in teams that recommend responses to international problems. Their recommendations are evaluated by outside experts based on policy reports or briefings created under strict deadlines. 'Task Force in Rome' allows students to investigate Europe-related policy issues 'in country' with easier access to European experts and policymakers who can provide expertise and evaluated the Task Force reports and presentations. Visits to European and international organizations based in Rome and vicinity as well as visiting experts and speakers from nearby European countries enhance the experience of working on timely international policy challenges. In Winter 2017 the overarching program theme was 'Challenges to European Unity' and the program consisted of two five-credit courses on European economic integration and on European security challenges, as well as a five-credit Task Force investigating issues relating to those two courses. The content courses are uniquely conceived to prepared students for their work in Task Force as well as providing upper-level JSIS credit for seniors. All students in the program will be seniors in the International Studies major. In Winter 2018 modifications were made based on an extensive on-site evaluation of the 2017 'pilot program': students were divided into two Task Forces of ten students each, with each Task Force related to one of the intent courses, with each program faculty responsible for one Task Force. This will improve the ability of Task Forces to work together. These modifications were based on student suggestions. Otherwise the 2018 program investigated similar topics and policy issues as the 2017 program. In Winter 2019 modifications were made based on feedback from the 2018 program, but otherwise the 2019 program looked at similar topics and issues as the 2018 program. In Winter 2020 the task force will follow the Winter 2018 model with two senior faculty members leading two task forces each with a related content course, with each faculty member responsible for one Task Force and one related content course.
 

LOCATION

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Sites

Rome, Italy

Housing

Private apartments are made available through the UW Rome Center.

ACADEMICS

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Prerequisites and Language Requirements

Only Jackson School students are eligible for Task Force will be admitted. Selection within the Jackson School will be based on (1) major, (2) class standing, (3) GPA, (4) letters of recommendation, (5) reasons for wanting to participate in this particular program, (6) ability to adapt to new situations, (7) willingness to work with others, (8) interview. There are no special physical requirements.

Credits

15 UW Quarter Credits

Courses

JSIS A 304: Contemporary European Migration: Ethnography of Migration and Multiculturalism in Europe (5 credits) I&S

Because of the recent political importance of issues of international migration and the adaptation of migrant populations to European societies, anthropologists have produced much recent ethnography treating these subjects. Students in the class will read five selected ethnographies and write response papers on three of them. Two of the ethnographies will focus on Italy providing insights to students about the use of public space by natives and immigrants in Rome and Naples that they also can observe and investigate. The two ethnographies on Italy will be contrasted with ethnographies of France and Spain that will illustrate how modes of defining national identity, citizenship, and historical memory differ among the European countries and affect how immigrants can variously adapt. Room will be left for each student to select an additional ethnography tailored to a country and issue of their particular interest.

Learning goals include:
The main purpose is to give students examples of the complex interaction of national identity and citizenship with the use of urban space in historic cities, and of the pattern of use of various public spaces by native and immigrants alike in several contrasting European countries. This will help students understand the variety of ways different European peoples understand their historical experience, citizenship, and national identity, and how these differences lead to different immigrant experiences. This should also help students understand the complex and varying ways that economic and social institutions structure the immigrant experience. We will provide examples of institutions and developments such as ethno-psychiatry that ease immigrant adjustment in various European countries, as well. Students will be assessed by three response papers, one in-class presentation of field observations, and overall class participation.

 

JSIS B 330: International Political Economy: Global Business from a European Perspective (5 credits) I&S

This course prepares students to understand the most important aspects of the international political economy. It investigates the important relationships among nations and business and economic institutions that influence students' performances as managers, consumers, and citizens. Emphasis will be on the economic and business relations between European countries (especially the EU) and other large economic areas including the Atlantic and Pacific economies. Business and trade challenges for the EU arising from the rise of East Asian countries (especially China) will be a main theme of the course.

Learning goals include:
The course will categorize and explain the international and European institutions governing international business, corporate behavior and global trade. We will identify distinct approaches and explanatory models of politics and economics relating to regulation f business, including consumer issues and commercial behavior. We will apply explanatory models to specific issues concerning economic and business relations between Europe and other economic regions, specifically East Asia.


In addition to the two courses listed above student will take one of the following Task Force course:

JSIS 495: Task Force: A Common Asylum and Migration Policy for the European Union? (5 credits)
I&S

On September 26, 2017 French President Emmanuel Macron in a major speech at the Sorbonne proposed as one of six keys for "rebuilding a sovereign, united and democratic Europe" the reform of European Union migration policy including establishing a European asylum office and European border policy to ensure "rigorous management of borders across Europe." He linked this new migration policy also to foreign policy coordination (another of his six keys). Students will be asked to prepare a white paper discussing the issues involved in coming up with a common migration policy for Europe taking into account fundamental issues of human rights as well as issues of national sovereignty, identity, and competitiveness and the concrete social issues involved with accommodating migrant populations already in Europe.

Learning goals include:
Students will learn how to cooperate with each other to produce a white paper that is more than the sum of each individual contribution. They will identity the variety of migration and asylum policies of major European countries in order to identify points of commonality and of difference. Students will discuss among themselves policy alternatives and come up with a plausible proposal for a common European migration and asylum policy that they can defend to an outside examiner. Finally students write write a common white paper persuasive enough to convinced a policy specialist of the viability of their proposal. This will give students skill of cooperation, research, problem solving, and writing in addition to the concrete contents they will learn about their subject matter.

 

JSIS 495: Task Force: The EU/European Economy in Global Perspective: EU-China Relations (5 credits) I&S

This task force will examine how Europe should deal with the rise of Chinese investment and trade in the European region.

Learning goals include:
Students will learn how to cooperate with each other to produce a white paper that is more than the sum of each individual contribution. They will identity the issues related to Chinese investment in and trade with China that are causing friction in Europe. How should Europe deal with the rise of China and its impact on Europe. Students will discuss among themselves policy alternatives and come up with a plausible proposal for how Europe should deal with China that they can defend to an outside examiner. Finally students write write a common white paper persuasive enough to convinced a policy specialist of the viability of their proposal. This will give students skill of cooperation, research, problem solving, and writing in addition to the concrete contents they will learn about their subject matter.

PROGRAM LEADERSHIP

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Clark W. SorensenCompass


Professor, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies


sangok@uw.edu

Marie AnchordoguyCompassProfessor, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
anchor@uw.edu

 


 

 

FINANCES

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Program Expenses

Estimated Program Fee: $8,300

Included in the program fee:

  • $450 Study Abroad Fee
  • Instruction
  • Housing
  • Program activities and program travel
Not included in the program fee:
  • Airfare (average price subject to when and where your buy your ticket - $1,600)
  • Food (about $27/day)
  • UW Student Abroad Insurance ($1.64/day)
  • Other health expenses/immunizations
  • Personal spending money


Payment Due Date: January 24, 2020

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. Check your MyUW Account periodically for due dates.

Financial Aid

  • A large percentage of UW students utilize financial aid to study abroad. Most types of financial aid can be applied to study abroad fees.
  • You can submit a revision request to increase the amount of aid for the quarter you are studying abroad. These additional funds are usually awarded in the form of loans. To apply, fill out a revision request form, attach the budget sheet (available via the link at the top of this brochure) and submit these documents to the Office of Student Financial Aid.  For more information about this process, consult the Financial Aid section of our website.
  • Consult the Financial Aid section of our website for more information on applying for financial aid, special considerations for summer and early fall programs, and budgeting and fundraising tips.

Scholarships

  • There are many scholarships designed to fund students studying abroad. The UW Study Abroad administers a study abroad scholarship program and there are national awards available as well.
  • Scholarships vary widely in their parameters. Some are need-based, some are location-based, and some are merit-based.
  • To be considered for a UW Study Abroad Scholarship fill out a short questionnaire on your UW Study Abroad program application.  You must apply by the priority application deadline for the program in order to be considered for a scholarship.  Click the Overview tab to view application deadlines.
  • Consult our Scholarships page to learn about UW-based and national scholarships. The Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards can help you learn about additional opportunities.

Budgeting Tools

We understand that figuring out your finances for study abroad can be complicated and we are here to help. Below are some ways to find additional support.

  • Click on the Budget Sheets link at the top of this brochure to view the estimated budget of all expenses for this program.
  • Contact the Global Opportunities Adviser at goglobal@uw.edu to learn more about how to pay for study abroad.
  • Attend a Financial Planning Workshop offered by UW Study Abroad – more information is on the Events page of our website.
  • Visit the Finances section of our website.

APPLICATION CONSIDERATIONS

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Application Process

The study abroad application includes a personal statement, three short answer questions, one recommendation from a professor or TA, and electronic signature documents related to UW policies and expectations for study abroad. Following the online application process, you may be contacted by the program director for an in-person interview. Once an admission decision has been made regarding your application, you will be notified by the study abroad system via email.

Orientation

To be eligible to study abroad, you must complete the mandatory pre-departure online orientation provided by UW Study Abroad. You must also attend program-specific orientations offered by the program director.

You will be able to access the online orientation through your study abroad application once you have been accepted to a program. Orientation must be completed prior to the enrollment deadline for the quarter that you are studying abroad.

Visas

UW Study Abroad is not responsible for obtaining visas for study abroad program participants. The cost and requirements for obtaining visas vary. It is your responsibility to determine visa requirements for all countries you plan to visit while abroad including countries that you plan to visit before or after your study abroad program. This is an especially important consideration if you are planning to do more than one study abroad program. You can research visa requirements by calling the consular offices of those countries or checking the following website: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html.

Note: If you are not a U.S. citizen, consult the embassy or consulate of the countries you will visit to learn their document requirements. You can check the following website to find contact information for the consulate of the country you will be visiting: https://www.state.gov/s/cpr/32122.htm.

For non-U.S. citizens, the procedures that you will need to follow may be different than those for U.S. citizens. It is important to initiate this process as soon as possible in order to assemble documents and allow time for lengthy procedures.

Disability Accommodations

The University of Washington is committed to providing access and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, and education for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodation for this program, contact Disability Resources for Students at least 8 weeks in advance of your departure date. Contact info at disability.uw.edu.

Withdrawals

$350 of the total program fee and the $450 UW Study Abroad Fee are non-refundable once you have submitted a contract. Students withdrawing from a program are responsible for paying a percentage of the program fee depending on the date of withdrawal. More details about the withdrawal policy will be included in your payment contract. No part of the program fee is refundable once the program has begun. The date of withdrawal is considered the business day a withdrawal application is received by UW Study Abroad. Notice of withdrawal from the program must be made in writing by completing the following steps:

  1. Provide notice in writing to the program director that you will no longer be participating in the program.
  2. Submit a withdrawal application to UW Study Abroad.

Visit the Withdrawals section of our website for more information.

Additional Info