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Program Information:

Title
QUICK FACTS
Location Kampala, Uganda, with side trips to Mbarara, Fort Portal, Murchison Falls Park, and Gulu.
Academic Term Early Fall
08/12/2019 - 09/06/2019
Estimated Program Fee $5,450
Credits 5
Prerequisites Undergraduate and graduate students welcome. Students need to be academically motivated and flexible. If a graduate student, we can help you with completing a practicum or thesis/capstone (you can partake of some or all of the scheduled program as well). Bring a sense of building community and cultural humility.
Program Directors Bert Stover | bstover@uw.edu
Amy Hagopian hagopian@uw.edu
Program Manager Katherine Kroeger | studyabroad@uw.edu
Priority Application Deadline February 15, 2019
Extended Deadline March 3, 2019
Information Sessions We have scheduled an information session for Friday, Feb. 8, at noon in the Health Sciences complex (room H679, 6th floor of the H wing, just above the Rotunda cafeteria). NOTE: This is sometimes tricky for people to find. DO NOT TRY to access the 6th floor from another wing. Just come up from the Rotunda using the H-wing elevator
HIGHLIGHTS
General Four weeks in Uganda studying the relationship between water and health, based at Makerere University with UW faculty, with field trips to public water treatment facilities, bottling plants, farms, clinics and hospitals, family homes, and other places where people interact with water. We'll examine how historical, social, economic, political, geographic and environmental factors in Uganda have contributed to water-related health problems and solutions. Visits to Jinja, Mbarara, Kaseese, Fort Portal, Murchison Falls Park, Gulu, and, if possible, a refugee camp.
Visas  
 

Program Description

Water is fundamental to human life and health. Students in this course will explore the social and economic determinants of health in Uganda through the lens of water quality and access. We will explore health problems caused by water, water rights and politics, how social dynamics influence and are influenced by water, and the role of government in ensuring access to safe water and distributing it equitably. UW faculty a have strong partnership with Makerere University in Uganda. Makerere faculty will offer their expertise through lectures and consultation. Assignments: Students each will select a theme related to water and health in Uganda, tracing back water-related problems to their immediate and underlying causes. Students will prepare three 5-page papers (one before leaving, one during our trip, and one upon return). The first paper will address the epidemiology and treatment of water borne conditions. The second paper will focus on water infrastructure in Uganda, based on student observations and in-country explorations. Upon return, students write their third paper on water policy in Uganda, set in the African context. Students will be expected to attend talks, visits and tours, create meaningful partnerships with Makerere colleagues, keep daily journals, read local newspapers, and otherwise immerse themselves in life in Uganda. We will visit public water treatment facilities, bottling plants, farms, clinics and hospitals, family homes, and other places where people interact with water. The purpose of these visits is to learn how historical, social, economic, political, geographic and environmental factors in Uganda have contributed to water-related health problems and solutions. We will travel from Kampala to Jinja, Mbarara, Kaseese, Fort Portal, Murchison Falls Park, Gulu, and, if possible, a refugee camp.
 

LOCATION

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Sites

Kampala, Uganda, with side trips to Mbarara, Fort Portal, Murchison Falls Park, and Gulu.

Housing

Our primary housing during the first two weeks of this study abroad program will be at Nabacwa Guest House, where our previous study abroad program stayed. The program directors will be staying on site, as well. Students should expect to be housed two per room, with in-room bathroom and shower. The facility is a newly-built small apartment complex. After leaving Kampala we will stay at commercial hotels that are scouted and reserved by our local contractor. This is a low-income country, so students should expect a shortage of luxury (rustic bathrooms, intermittent internet, electrical outages, frustrating transportation).

ACADEMICS

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Prerequisites and Language Requirements

Undergraduate and graduate students welcome. Students need to have some prior experience with literature reviews, gathering data through observation, and otherwise investigating a topic to produce a coherent, well-written academic paper. Traveling in Uganda (navigating public transportation systems), and participating in facility tours requires the ability to climb stairs and carry one's own stuff. Students will share housing accommodations, so be prepared for minimal privacy. Because Uganda was colonized by the British, English is spoken most everywhere we will go.

Credits

5 UW Quarter Credits

Courses

GH 490 Special Topics in Global Health, with course title, Public Health Uganda (5 credits) Individual & Society, Diversity, Natural World

Students each will select a theme related to water and health in Uganda, tracing back water-related problems to their immediate and underlying causes. Students will prepare three 5-page papers (one before leaving, one during our trip, and one upon return). The first paper will address the epidemiology and treatment of water borne conditions. The second paper will focus on water infrastructure in Uganda, based on student observations and in-country explorations. Upon return, students write their third paper on water policy in Uganda, set in the African context. Students will be expected to attend talks, visits and tours, create meaningful partnerships with their Makerere colleagues, keep daily journals, read local newspapers, and otherwise immerse themselves in life in Uganda. Students will be provided a menu of water-related themes, and topics will be distributed to ensure a variety of subjects will be covered. Students will read each other's papers to expand their knowledge. Makerere student partners will help UW students access information and conduct observational studies of water quality and access. Students will conduct some water exploration with classmates and Makerere partners. They may visit water facilities, sanitation facilities, health facilities, businesses , family homes, and other places where people interact with water. As a group, we will visit public water treatment facilities, bottling plants, farms, clinics and hospitals, and other places where people interact with water. The purpose of these visits is to learn how historical, social, economic, political, geographic and environmental factors in Uganda have contributed to water-related health problems and solutions. We will travel from Kampala to Jinja, Mbarara, Kaseese, Fort Portal, Murchison Falls Park, Gulu, and, if possible, a refugee camp. After two weeks in the capital city, we will visit the communities of Jinja, Mbarara, Kasese, and Gulu. In each location, we will visit water supply and sanitation facilities, visit health facilities and district health offices, talk with local health officials, and visit operations that use water to produce products and crops. Lecturers, delivered by both UW and Makerere faculty as well as local health and governmental officials and community activists, will address the topics concerning access and quality of water, water-related health problems, human rights, pathophysiology of high burden illnesses, income and water security. Upon arrival back in Kampala, students will be expected to join with the Makerere student partners to review their findings, provide informal presentations, and complete a paper on water policy in Uganda. We will invite our Makerere colleagues to a final team social gathering.

Explain the burden of disease in Uganda associated with water-related problems. Describe the historical, social, economic, political, geographic and environmental determinants of health in Uganda, using the lens of water quality and access. Describe Uganda's water and sanitation infrastructure. Describe and critique Uganda's national water policy, and the roles of non-governmental organizations, both non-profit and for-profit. Recommend changes to political, educational, health and other systems that would improve access to and quality of water and related health services in Uganda. Engage successfully in field work in Uganda, including successfully navigating cultural, language and logistical issues.

PROGRAM LEADERSHIP

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Bert Stover
Clinical Assistant Professor, Health Services

Bert Stover, PhD, is a researcher at the University of Washington. Bert has worked with and trained students, medical researchers and practitioners in the use statistical analysis software, data management systems, epidemiological methods and statistical analysis. His research interests include health services systems and providing care for mothers in low resource settings. We investigated health systems strengthening in Uganda and the effects of PEPFAR investment on the health system. We conducted a Public Health Evaluation on the effects of PEPFAR investment on health system strengthening in Uganda. We visited 315 health care facilities and 112 district offices to collect 6-years of routine health services data. We looked at improving care for mothers and children in Timor-Leste, for those living far from health services, through the application of mobile phone use. The program piloted phone implementation among pregnant women in comparative districts to increase access to antenatal care at MOH service delivery sites.
bstover@uw.edu

Amy Hagopian
Associate Professor, Global Health

Amy Hagopian, MHA, PhD, is director of a University of Washington MPH degree program, Community Oriented Public Health Practice, which employs problem-based learning and focuses on social justice determinants of public health. Along with Bert Stover and other UW colleagues, she worked with Makerere University to study the effects on the health system of the U.S. PEPFAR program, which offered anti-retroviral and other HIV care. She led a team to estimate mortality associated with the 2003 invasion of Iraq, which involved surveying 2000 households across Iraq. She’s also researched the migration of health workers from poor countries to rich ones, and works on homelessness and incarceration as health issues. She teaches health policy, program evaluation, public health skills and a course on war and health.
hagopian@uw.edu

FINANCES

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Program Expenses

$5,450

Included in the program fee:

  • $450 Study Abroad Fee
  • Instruction
  • Housing
  • Program activities and program travel
Not included in the program fee:
  • Airfare (average price subject to when and where your buy your ticket - $1,500)
  • Food (Students should expect to pay for occasional meals (especially on weekends), incidental expenses, and transportation if not with the group.)
  • UW Student Abroad Insurance ($1.64/day)
  • Other health expenses/immunizations
  • Personal spending money


Payment Due Date:October 11, 2019

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. Check your MyUW Account periodically for due dates.

Financial Aid

  • A large percentage of UW students utilize financial aid to study abroad. Most types of financial aid can be applied to study abroad fees.
  • You can submit a revision request to increase the amount of aid for the quarter you are studying abroad. These additional funds are usually awarded in the form of loans. To apply, fill out a revision request form, attach the budget sheet (available via the link at the top of this brochure) and submit these documents to the Office of Student Financial Aid.  For more information about this process, consult the Financial Aid section of our website.
  • Consult the Financial Aid section of our website for more information on applying for financial aid, special considerations for summer and early fall programs, and budgeting and fundraising tips.

Scholarships

  • There are many scholarships designed to fund students studying abroad. The UW Study Abroad administers a study abroad scholarship program and there are national awards available as well.
  • Scholarships vary widely in their parameters. Some are need-based, some are location-based, and some are merit-based.
  • To be considered for a UW Study Abroad Scholarship fill out a short questionnaire on your UW Study Abroad program application.  You must apply by the priority application deadline for the program in order to be considered for a scholarship.  Click the Overview tab to view application deadlines.
  • Consult our Scholarships page to learn about UW-based and national scholarships. The Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards can help you learn about additional opportunities.

Budgeting Tools

We understand that figuring out your finances for study abroad can be complicated and we are here to help. Below are some ways to find additional support.

  • Click on the Budget Sheets link at the top of this brochure to view the estimated budget of all expenses for this program.
  • Contact the Global Opportunities Adviser at goglobal@uw.edu to learn more about how to pay for study abroad.
  • Attend a Financial Planning Workshop offered by UW Study Abroad – more information is on the Events page of our website.
  • Visit the Finances section of our website.

APPLICATION CONSIDERATIONS

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Application Process

The study abroad application includes a personal statement, three short answer questions, one recommendation from a professor or TA, and electronic signature documents related to UW policies and expectations for study abroad. Following the online application process, you may be contacted by the program director for an in-person interview. Once an admission decision has been made regarding your application, you will be notified by the study abroad system via email.

Orientation

To be eligible to study abroad, you must complete the mandatory pre-departure online orientation provided by UW Study Abroad. You must also attend program-specific orientations offered by the program director.

You will be able to access the online orientation through your study abroad application once you have been accepted to a program. Orientation must be completed prior to the enrollment deadline for the quarter that you are studying abroad.

Visas

UW Study Abroad is not responsible for obtaining visas for study abroad program participants. The cost and requirements for obtaining visas vary. It is your responsibility to determine visa requirements for all countries you plan to visit while abroad including countries that you plan to visit before or after your study abroad program. This is an especially important consideration if you are planning to do more than one study abroad program. You can research visa requirements by calling the consular offices of those countries or checking the following website: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html.

Note: If you are not a U.S. citizen, consult the embassy or consulate of the countries you will visit to learn their document requirements. You can check the following website to find contact information for the consulate of the country you will be visiting: https://www.state.gov/s/cpr/32122.htm.

For non-U.S. citizens, the procedures that you will need to follow may be different than those for U.S. citizens. It is important to initiate this process as soon as possible in order to assemble documents and allow time for lengthy procedures.

Disability Accommodations

The University of Washington is committed to providing access and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, and education for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodation for this program, contact Disability Resources for Students at least 8 weeks in advance of your departure date. Contact info at disability.uw.edu.

Withdrawals

$350 of the total program fee and the $450 UW Study Abroad Fee are non-refundable once you have submitted a contract. Students withdrawing from a program are responsible for paying a percentage of the program fee depending on the date of withdrawal. More details about the withdrawal policy will be included in your payment contract. No part of the program fee is refundable once the program has begun. The date of withdrawal is considered the business day a withdrawal application is received by UW Study Abroad. Notice of withdrawal from the program must be made in writing by completing the following steps:

  1. Provide notice in writing to the program director that you will no longer be participating in the program.
  2. Submit a withdrawal application to UW Study Abroad.

Visit the Withdrawals section of our website for more information.

Additional Info

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