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  • Locations: Busan, South Korea
  • Program Terms: Early Fall
  • Budget Sheets: Early Fall
Dates / Deadlines:

There are currently no active application cycles for this program.
Fact Sheet:
Fact Sheet:
Affiliated Department: UW Bothell Foreign Language Required: None
Primary Language(s) of Instruction: English UW Credits: 5
Estimated Program Fee: 3500 UW Program Director: Gunwha Oh, Jin-Kyu Jung
UW Study Abroad Program Manager: Katherine R Kroeger UW Program Staff Email: gunwhaoh@uw.edu, jkjung5@uw.edu
Program Information:

Title
QUICK FACTS
Location Busan, South Korea
Academic Term Early Fall
08/11/2019 - 09/03/2019
Estimated Program Fee $3,950
Credits 5
Prerequisites There are no academic prerequisites. Applicants will be interviewed to ensure that they have an accurate understanding of the program and it will be a good fit for their interests.
Program Directors Jin-Kyu Jung | jkjung5@uw.edu
Gunwha Oh gunwhaoh@uw.edu
Program Manager | studyabroad@uw.edu
Priority Application Deadline February 15, 2019
Extended Deadline March 3, 2019
Information Sessions TBD - Please contact program directors for more information
HIGHLIGHTS
General The seminar provides students with a critical reflection on the smart city, urban regeneration and community-building process in the context of modern cities in South Korea, in particular Busan. This course will also provide students an opportunity to work with digital (mapping) mapping technologies as the process of the creative engagmeent with local communities.
Visas  
 

Program Description

In the Early Fall (August 11 - September 3, 2019), UW Bothell's School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences (IAS) proposes to offer an exploratory seminar entitled "Urban Exploration in Busan, South Korea: Mapping Communities in the Smart City." This course provides students with a critical reflection on the possibilities and challenges of the smart city on urban regeneration and community-building process in the context of modern cities in South Korea. The discourse of the smart city epitomizes a new paradigm shift in the cities in the world. It builds new urban models that raise city's competitive power and efficiency in planning and control with the integration of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in various urban domains, human and physical environmental recourses. The smart city idea is already actively implemented in South Korea's urban governance and urban planning and policy with economic support and technological advancement. The smart city obviously demands smart technologies and infrastructure and smart governance to succeed; however, questions still remain if smart city development enacts to build a better community and if it presents citizens with more opportunities for improving their communities. Drawing on evidence from three cities in Korea – Busan, Sejong, and Changwon, this class will provide students an opportunity to experience creative engagements with local communities, and to explore re-working with (already-familiar) smart technologies and infrastructure in urban revitalization and community-building. The main study site is the City of Busan. Busan is the second largest city in Korea and it is leading the smart city movement filled with futuristic smart architecture and infrastructure with smart technology, supported by smart governance. Busan has a lot of similarity to Seattle. It conveniently located by the sea and surround by mountains, and it is a harbor city that grew into the largest container handling port in the county and the fifth largest in the world. Due to the city's natural endowments, rich histories, and rapid urban development over the past few decades, the identity of city has been redefined as a global city for tourism and culture. Busan sets up 'Smart 3.0' and 'Convenient Smart City' as one of key visions for Busan 2030 master plan, and made a strategic choice to build three smart city clusters in Sassang, Centum City, and Young-Do districts. Busan will be a good example of the global smart city development that emphasizes an open smart technology and development environment, as well as support creative economy through loT (Internet of Things) based ICT platform to foster a world-class smart city development. The course will start with a series of seminars and mini-conference that will introduce students to some of key concepts around smart city, urban regeneration, and community-building. There will be various "urban expeditions" that will expose students to different local communities in Busan, Changwon, and Sejong, and translate key concepts in the seminar into the real-world examples they will observe and engage with. In addition, this course will provide students an opportunity to learn and work with digital (mapping) technologies, such as online mapping, digital story maps, and mobile GPS app, as the process of unfolding their engagement with local communities and community partners. This program will be held in collaboration with the Pusan National University (PNU), the City of Busan, the City of Changwon, and the City of Sejong. Readings will be assigned in advance of the seminar. The faculties and students in PNU will join the lectures and workshops in the first 2 weeks, and students will visit various sites they can have a experiential learning experience of urban regeneration efforts and a diverse range of community-based projects, couple with the smart urban development in Korea.
 

LOCATION

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Sites

Busan, South Korea

Housing

The first 2 weeks of the seminar will take place in Busan, Korea, with Pusan National University (PNU) providing on-campus housing. This will give students a chance to experience Korean campus life and also easy access to the conference/workshop sites in PNU campus. In the third week, we will stay in a hotel in the city of Changwon and Sejong, and then return to Busan in the 4th week.We will stay at PNU university housing again in our last week in Korea.

ACADEMICS

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Prerequisites and Language Requirements

There are no academic prerequisites. Applicants will be interviewed to ensure that they have an accurate understanding of the program and it will be a good fit for their interests. Students will talk approximately 2-3 miles a day as we travel between various sites and use public transportation for much of our inner-city travel. In the summertime, Korea has a hot and humid climate. Students will need to dress properly for warm weather and keep hydrated.

Credits

5 UW Quarter Credits

Courses

BISGST 497 International Study Abroad or GEOG 498 Advanced Study Abroad: Urban Exploration in Busan, South Korea: Mapping Communities in the Smart City (5 credits) I&S

This course provides students with a critical reflection on the possibilities and challenges of the smart city on urban regeneration and community-building process in the context of modern cities in South Korea. The discourse of the smart city epitomizes a new paradigm shift in the cities in the world. It builds new urban models that raise city's competitive power and efficiency in planning and control with the integration of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in various urban domains, human and physical environmental recourses. The smart city idea is already actively implemented in South Korea's urban governance and urban planning and policy with economic support and technological advancement. The smart city obviously demands smart technologies and infrastructure and smart governance to succeed; however, questions still remain if smart city development enacts to build a better community and if it presents citizens with more opportunities for improving their communities. Drawing on evidence from three cities in Korea; Busan, Sejong, and Changwon, this class will provide students an opportunity to experience creative engagements with local communities, and to explore re-working with (already-familiar) smart technologies and infrastructure in urban revitalization and community-building process. The main study site is the City of Busan. Busan is the second largest city in Korea and it is leading the smart city movement filled with futuristic smart architecture and infrastructure with smart technology, supported by smart governance. Busan has a lot of similarity to Seattle. It conveniently located by the sea and surround by mountains, and it is a harbor city that grew into the largest container handling port in the county and the fifth largest in the world. Due to the city's natural endowments, rich histories, and rapid urban development over the past few decades, the identity of city has been redefined as a global city for tourism and culture. Busan sets up ‘Smart 3.0' and ‘Convenient Smart City' as one of key visions for Busan 2030 master plan, and made a strategic choice to build three smart city clusters in Sassang, Centum City, and Young-Do districts. Busan will be a good example of the global smart city development that emphasizes an open smart technology and development environment, as well as support creative economy through loT (Internet of Things) based ICT platform to foster a world-class smart city development. The course will start with a series of seminars and mini-conference that will introduce students to some of key concepts around smart city, urban regeneration, and community-building. There will be various "urban expeditions" that will expose students to different local communities in Busan, and translate key concepts in the seminar into the real-world examples they will observe and engage with. In addition, this course will provide students an opportunity to learn and work with digital (mapping) technologies, such as online mapping, digital story maps, and mobile GPS app, as the process of unfolding their engagement with local communities and community partners.

Learning goals include:
In this seminar, students will: Learn about the possibilities and challenges of the smart city development, in relation to urban regeneration and community-building process in Korea; Explore to (re-)work with smart technologies and infrastructure in urban revitalization and community-building process; Have a structured community-based learning and research (CBLR) opportunity to work with local communities; Practice digital mapping and story map techniques to capture and represent their experiences of various urban explorations and community engagement; Develop basic Korean communication skills through interactive sessions that emphasize vocabulary and grammatical structure, cultural presentations and oral interactions Student learning will be assessed through a seminar participation, written reflections on readings, workshop and fieldwork, a creation of digital StoryMap, and a final paper. Seminar participation (20%): Seminar participation and group work will be fundamental to the success of this exploration seminar. Participation in various activities will have a significant bearing on the final grade and will help ensure maximum benefits for all involved. We will design specific activities around the key themes (e.g. smart technology, urban revitalization) and will assess students' participation through our direct daily interaction with students; Digital StoryMap (20%): The digital StoryMap will be used to tell and show the spatial stories. ESRI Story Maps (http://storymaps.arcgis.com/en) will be used for creating a web-based interactive digital mapping that students can combine digital maps with narrative, images, and multimedia such as image, audio, and video; Two 2-page short essays (20%): These short essays will be done during the exploration seminar. In these essays, students should clearly describe and reflect on what are accomplished in the different urban expedition and community visits. We will use these essays to assess how students connect their field experiences with relevant literature and key themes in this course; One 5-page final reflection essay (20%): The final reflection essay should incorporate an in-depth discussion about any key topic of choice. The essay should at least have a solid discussion of a key topic with a critical thought piece in relation to the key topic/theme. Students need to substantiate their thoughts with appropriate evidence and analysis or interpretation based on their seminar experience, and their ideas should be presented in a clear, well-organized manner; Final Presentation (20%): Students will have an opportunity to present their final group work in public. The quality of presentation will be evaluated by the explanation of project goals, the description of process, and analysis/reflection of outcomes and process of their community-based projects.

 



 

 


 

 


 

PROGRAM LEADERSHIP

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Jin-Kyu Jung
Associate Professor, School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, UW-Bothell

Dr. Jung is an urban geographer/planner who has a theoretical and practical expertise in GIS and a mixed-methods approach. His research focuses on exploring the importance of power and politics as well as the complexities of race, class, gender and sexualities in cities, and asks how the shaping of these categories effectively complicates urban geographical and planning knowledge.
jkjung5@uw.edu

Gunwha Oh
Lecturer, School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, UW-Bothell

Dr. Oh has extensive experience in teaching digital mapping and GIS and GIS database. She has a strong background in GIS and spatial analysis and urban planning, and has a familiarity to Busan, Korea. She will help students to see the new insights of the city with the critical use of GIS and visualization tackling many undiscovered urban issues and possibilities.
gunwhaoh@uw.edu

 

 

FINANCES

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Program Expenses

Estimated Program Fee: $3,950

Included in the program fee:

  • $450 Study Abroad Fee
  • Instruction
  • Housing
  • Program activities and program travel
Not included in the program fee:
  • Airfare (average price subject to when and where your buy your ticket - TBD)
  • Food (about TBD)
  • UW Student Abroad Insurance ($1.64/day)
  • Other health expenses/immunizations
  • Personal spending money


Payment Due Date: October 11, 2019

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. Check your MyUW Account periodically for due dates.

Financial Aid

  • A large percentage of UW students utilize financial aid to study abroad. Most types of financial aid can be applied to study abroad fees.
  • You can submit a revision request to increase the amount of aid for the quarter you are studying abroad. These additional funds are usually awarded in the form of loans. To apply, fill out a revision request form, attach the budget sheet (available via the link at the top of this brochure) and submit these documents to the Office of Student Financial Aid.  For more information about this process, consult the Financial Aid section of our website.
  • Consult the Financial Aid section of our website for more information on applying for financial aid, special considerations for summer and early fall programs, and budgeting and fundraising tips.

Scholarships

  • There are many scholarships designed to fund students studying abroad. The UW Study Abroad administers a study abroad scholarship program and there are national awards available as well.
  • Scholarships vary widely in their parameters. Some are need-based, some are location-based, and some are merit-based.
  • To be considered for a UW Study Abroad Scholarship fill out a short questionnaire on your UW Study Abroad program application.  You must apply by the priority application deadline for the program in order to be considered for a scholarship.  Click the Overview tab to view application deadlines.
  • Consult our Scholarships page to learn about UW-based and national scholarships. The Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards can help you learn about additional opportunities.

Budgeting Tools

We understand that figuring out your finances for study abroad can be complicated and we are here to help. Below are some ways to find additional support.

  • Click on the Budget Sheets link at the top of this brochure to view the estimated budget of all expenses for this program.
  • Contact the Global Opportunities Adviser at goglobal@uw.edu to learn more about how to pay for study abroad.
  • Attend a Financial Planning Workshop offered by UW Study Abroad – more information is on the Events page of our website.
  • Visit the Finances section of our website.

APPLICATION CONSIDERATIONS

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Application Process

The study abroad application includes a personal statement, three short answer questions, one recommendation from a professor or TA, and electronic signature documents related to UW policies and expectations for study abroad. Following the online application process, you may be contacted by the program director for an in-person interview. Once an admission decision has been made regarding your application, you will be notified by the study abroad system via email.

Orientation

To be eligible to study abroad, you must complete the mandatory pre-departure online orientation provided by UW Study Abroad. You must also attend program-specific orientations offered by the program director.

You will be able to access the online orientation through your study abroad application once you have been accepted to a program. Orientation must be completed prior to the enrollment deadline for the quarter that you are studying abroad.

Visas

UW Study Abroad is not responsible for obtaining visas for study abroad program participants. The cost and requirements for obtaining visas vary. It is your responsibility to determine visa requirements for all countries you plan to visit while abroad including countries that you plan to visit before or after your study abroad program. This is an especially important consideration if you are planning to do more than one study abroad program. You can research visa requirements by calling the consular offices of those countries or checking the following website: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html.

Note: If you are not a U.S. citizen, consult the embassy or consulate of the countries you will visit to learn their document requirements. You can check the following website to find contact information for the consulate of the country you will be visiting: https://www.state.gov/s/cpr/32122.htm.

For non-U.S. citizens, the procedures that you will need to follow may be different than those for U.S. citizens. It is important to initiate this process as soon as possible in order to assemble documents and allow time for lengthy procedures.

Disability Accommodations

The University of Washington is committed to providing access and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, and education for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodation for this program, contact Disability Resources for Students at least 8 weeks in advance of your departure date. Contact info at disability.uw.edu.

Withdrawals

$350 of the total program fee and the $450 UW Study Abroad Fee are non-refundable once you have submitted a contract. Students withdrawing from a program are responsible for paying a percentage of the program fee depending on the date of withdrawal. More details about the withdrawal policy will be included in your payment contract. No part of the program fee is refundable once the program has begun. The date of withdrawal is considered the business day a withdrawal application is received by UW Study Abroad. Notice of withdrawal from the program must be made in writing by completing the following steps:

  1. Provide notice in writing to the program director that you will no longer be participating in the program.
  2. Submit a withdrawal application to UW Study Abroad.

Visit the Withdrawals section of our website for more information.

Additional Info

This program will appeal to the students who seek to learn about cities, urban life, new information technology, smart city, community-based learning and research, and community-building process. The seminar will have broad cross- and inter-disciplinary appeal, but expect highest interest among students from a variety of fields, including Geography, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Sceince, Technology & Society (STS), Global Studies, Environmental Studies, and Information School, and Asian Studies.