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  • Locations: Leon, Spain
  • Program Terms: Early Fall
  • Budget Sheets: Early Fall
Dates / Deadlines:

There are currently no active application cycles for this program.
Program Information:

Title
QUICK FACTS
Location Leon, Spain
Academic Term Early Fall
08/28/2019 - 09/20/2019
Estimated Program Fee $5,100
Credits 5
Prerequisites Students should be conversant with core social justice principles and ideas.
Program Directors William Vesneski, PhD, MSW, JD | vesneski@uw.edu
Carrie Lanza, PhD, MSW clanza@uw.edu
Program Manager Katherine Kroeger| studyabroad@uw.edu
Priority Application Deadline February 15th, 2019
Extended Deadline March 3, 2019
Information Sessions Early February dates, TBA at UW School of Social Work and at UWB Nursing & Health Studies
HIGHLIGHTS
General Using a social justice lens, this course examines historical and contemporary responses to human migration and the social conditions giving rise to it, including colonization, oppression, and globalization.
Visas This country is part of the Schengen area. Note that there are strict rules and restrictions for foreign visitors to this area that may impact a student's ability to travel within the region before or after their program, or to attend two subsequent programs in this area. It is critical that the student reviews the information and scenarios here to learn more about Schengen area visa requirements.
 

Program Description

Join Professors William Vesneski and Carrie Lanza, in partnership with the UW Leon Center, for an intellectually rigorous and experiential adventure in beautiful northern Spain during the Early Fall Start period. Set on the famed Camino de Santiago, Leon has sat at the crossroads of history for 2000 years. The city is also home to many migrant communities - many of whom have crossed the Mediteranean from Africa and the Middle East - proving Spain's reputation as one of the most welcoming countries in the EU. These communities have frequently come to Spain to escape economic injustice, violence and the climate crisis. Given this, Leon serves as a truly unique place for students of social justice to consider the ways that social forces - including power, oppression, colonization, religion, racism, globalization and marginalization - have shaped the lived experience of people in the past as well as today. This course will involve visits to historically and architecturally significant sites, dialog with local experts, in-class study, and critial reading. Together we will deeply explore the meaning and practice of social justice during a time of global challenge. VLPA and writing credit available. Optional Spanish language (for health and social work) will also be available, though not for credit.
 

LOCATION

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Sites

Leon, Spain

Housing

We will work with the Leon Center to arrange home stays for students.

ACADEMICS

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Prerequisites and Language Requirements

Students should be conversant with core social justice principles and ideas. Field activities will require walking and stair climbing.

Credits

5 UW Quarter Credits

Courses

Soc WF 497 / Soc W 597A: Advanced Study Abroad in Social Work (5 credits) Diversity, I&S, W (optional), VLPA (architectural and place analysis)

This rigorous and experiential course at the UW Leon campus in Spain will address key historical and intellectual currents in social justice thinking by focusing on the inclusion/exclusion of marginalized communities both today and over time. We will focus our study on past and current political crises, including nationalist and xenophobic movements. We will also attend to the uniquely Spanish rhetoric of compassion towards migrant populations in Europe and their implications for health and welfare services for vulnerable minority populations. Key areas of focus include: the role of neoliberalism (and its historical precursors) in health and social welfare provision, the implications of socialist thought in Spain, as well as the global challenges of migration and immigration and their linkages to settler colonialism both today and in the past. Whenever possible we will make comparative analyses of EU and US health and social welfare policies and practices toward migrant and ethnic minority communities. Assignments for this seminar course will feature community asset mapping, interviews, photo voice assignments, field trips with observations and debriefs, as well as independent scholarly writing. Optional Spanish language (for social work) will be available. Classes will be tailored to students' individual intellectual and social justice interests.

Learning goals include:
On completion of this course, students will be able to: articulate deep understanding of social justice principles and theories and apply this understanding to contemporary social issues with implications for US and international social welfare; demonstrate a critical understanding of the historical, cultural, political, and philosophical underpinnings of comparative social welfare and health policy with a focus on Spain and the US; and, demonstrate an understanding of issues facing those working in social welfare in international contexts. In addition, our assignments will be geared to helping students improve their ability to identify, engage, and critically assess multiple sources of knowledge about social problems and structures; enhance their critical awareness of intellectual and personal standpoints; build effective, respectful working relationships in collaboration with peers and instructors; engage in respectful dialogue when differences occur centered on the intent of understanding another's position; and enhance their ability to effectively communicate one's understanding and interpretation of materials both verbally and in writing.

BHLTH 400: Study Abroad for Health Studies (5 credits) Diversity, I&S, W (optional), VLPA (architectural and place analysis)

This intellectually rigorous and experiential course at the UW Leon campus in Spain will address the following topics: Key historical and intellectual currents in social justice thinking and their application to the inclusion/exclusion of racial and ethnic minorities both today and over time. The nature of past and current political crises, including nationalist and xenophobic movements as well as the uniquely Spanish contemporary rhetoric of compassion towards migrant populations in Europe and their implications for health and welfare services for vulnerable minority populations. We will assess the role of neoliberalism (and its historical precursors) in health and social welfare provision and consider also the implications of the current strength of socialist thought in Spain. We will focus on the global challenges of migration and immigration and their linkages to settler colonialism both today and in the past. We will aso make comparative analyses of EU and US health and social welfare policy and practice toward migrant and ethnic minority communities with a focus on local Spanish exemplars. We will consider strategies and approaches to achieving social justice during inhospitable times, including rising nationalism across the globe. Assignments for this seminar course will feature community asset mapping, independent scholarly writing, interviews, photo voice assignments, and field trips with observations and debriefs. Optional Spanish language (for social work) will be available. Classes will be tailored to students' individual intellectual and social justice interests.

Learning goals include:
--To enable students to critically analyze global trends and issues that impact health and welfare at local, regional, national, and transnational levels. --To increase students' understanding of programs, policies, and social movements that aim to address and improve health. --To build a foundation for lifelong learning about cultural humility, social justice, equity, and inclusion by helping students develop cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills that help them to work and interact across social, economic, and cultural contexts. --To encourage students to apply knowledge to practice by building their understanding of work, advocacy, or study opportunities either in the field of global health, or in related disciplines and fields. -- To identify strategies and approaches to achieving social justice during inhospitable times, including rising nationalism across the globe.

 


 

 


 

PROGRAM LEADERSHIP

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William Vesneski, PhD, MSW, JD
Lecturer (Full Time), Social Work

William Vesneski teaches across the social work curriculum with a focus on community and policy practice His research focuses on child welfare law and policy and he publishes in both social work and legal journals. He began his career as a public defender in juvenile court, representing parents in dependency proceedings and youth in criminal prosecutions. His teaching is anchored in providing students with both an intellectually rigorous experience as well as positioning them for creating positive change in the world. He has twice received the graduate social work students' annual teaching award.
vesneski@uw.edu

Carrie Lanza, PhD, MSW
Lecturer, UW School of Social Work/ UW Bothell School of Nursing & Health Studies

Carrie Lanza teaches social welfare history, theory and practice at UW School of Social Work and community health practice in the Health Studies program at UW Bothell. Her orientation to teaching is grounded in principles of critical pedagogy and community-engaged praxis as well as commitments to decolonizing, feminist, spatial and embodied theoretical lenses. Carrie's teaching is also informed by her experiences as a social worker, which has spanned both clinical practice in community and maternal/infant mental health as well as administrative practice in early childhood intervention, medical education, and academic pipeline programs. This will be Carrie's second Study Abroad program. She ran a program in Oaxaca, Mexico in 2016.
clanza@uw.edu

 

 

FINANCES

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Program Expenses

Estimated Program Fee: $5,100

Included in the program fee:

  • $450 Study Abroad Fee
  • Instruction
  • Housing
  • Program activities and program travel
Not included in the program fee:
  • Airfare (average price subject to when and where your buy your ticket - $750 (to Madrid))
  • Food (about $10-12)
  • UW Student Abroad Insurance ($1.64/day)
  • Other health expenses/immunizations
  • Personal spending money


Payment Due Date: October 11th, 2019

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. Check your MyUW Account periodically for due dates.

Financial Aid

  • A large percentage of UW students utilize financial aid to study abroad. Most types of financial aid can be applied to study abroad fees.
  • You can submit a revision request to increase the amount of aid for the quarter you are studying abroad. These additional funds are usually awarded in the form of loans. To apply, fill out a revision request form, attach the budget sheet (available via the link at the top of this brochure) and submit these documents to the Office of Student Financial Aid.  For more information about this process, consult the Financial Aid section of our website.
  • Consult the Financial Aid section of our website for more information on applying for financial aid, special considerations for summer and early fall programs, and budgeting and fundraising tips.

Scholarships

  • There are many scholarships designed to fund students studying abroad. The UW Study Abroad administers a study abroad scholarship program and there are national awards available as well.
  • Scholarships vary widely in their parameters. Some are need-based, some are location-based, and some are merit-based.
  • To be considered for a UW Study Abroad Scholarship fill out a short questionnaire on your UW Study Abroad program application.  You must apply by the priority application deadline for the program in order to be considered for a scholarship.  Click the Overview tab to view application deadlines.
  • Consult our Scholarships page to learn about UW-based and national scholarships. The Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards can help you learn about additional opportunities.

Budgeting Tools

We understand that figuring out your finances for study abroad can be complicated and we are here to help. Below are some ways to find additional support.

  • Click on the Budget Sheets link at the top of this brochure to view the estimated budget of all expenses for this program.
  • Contact the Global Opportunities Adviser at goglobal@uw.edu to learn more about how to pay for study abroad.
  • Attend a Financial Planning Workshop offered by UW Study Abroad – more information is on the Events page of our website.
  • Visit the Finances section of our website.

APPLICATION CONSIDERATIONS

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Application Process

The study abroad application includes a personal statement, three short answer questions, one recommendation from a professor or TA, and electronic signature documents related to UW policies and expectations for study abroad. Following the online application process, you may be contacted by the program director for an in-person interview. Once an admission decision has been made regarding your application, you will be notified by the study abroad system via email.

Orientation

To be eligible to study abroad, you must complete the mandatory pre-departure online orientation provided by UW Study Abroad. You must also attend program-specific orientations offered by the program director.

You will be able to access the online orientation through your study abroad application once you have been accepted to a program. Orientation must be completed prior to the enrollment deadline for the quarter that you are studying abroad.

Visas

UW Study Abroad is not responsible for obtaining visas for study abroad program participants. The cost and requirements for obtaining visas vary. It is your responsibility to determine visa requirements for all countries you plan to visit while abroad including countries that you plan to visit before or after your study abroad program. This is an especially important consideration if you are planning to do more than one study abroad program. You can research visa requirements by calling the consular offices of those countries or checking the following website: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html.

Note: If you are not a U.S. citizen, consult the embassy or consulate of the countries you will visit to learn their document requirements. You can check the following website to find contact information for the consulate of the country you will be visiting: https://www.state.gov/s/cpr/32122.htm.

For non-U.S. citizens, the procedures that you will need to follow may be different than those for U.S. citizens. It is important to initiate this process as soon as possible in order to assemble documents and allow time for lengthy procedures.

Disability Accommodations

The University of Washington is committed to providing access and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, and education for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodation for this program, contact Disability Resources for Students at least 8 weeks in advance of your departure date. Contact info at disability.uw.edu.

Withdrawals

$350 of the total program fee and the $450 UW Study Abroad Fee are non-refundable once you have submitted a contract. Students withdrawing from a program are responsible for paying a percentage of the program fee depending on the date of withdrawal. More details about the withdrawal policy will be included in your payment contract. No part of the program fee is refundable once the program has begun. The date of withdrawal is considered the business day a withdrawal application is received by UW Study Abroad. Notice of withdrawal from the program must be made in writing by completing the following steps:

  1. Provide notice in writing to the program director that you will no longer be participating in the program.
  2. Submit a withdrawal application to UW Study Abroad.

Visit the Withdrawals section of our website for more information.

Additional Info

Homestays will include 2 meals per day.