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  • Locations: Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Program Terms: Summer A-Term, Summer B-Term
  • Budget Sheets: Summer B-Term
Dates / Deadlines:

There are currently no active application cycles for this program.
Program Information:

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QUICK FACTS
Location Amsterdam, Netherlands
Academic Term Summer Quarter (B-Term) 2018
July 15- August 19, 2018
Estimated Program Fee $4,150
Credits 10 UW credits
Prerequisites None
Program Directors Ann Frost; Marco Brydolf-Horwitz
Program Manager Katherine Kroeger | studyabroad@uw.edu
Priority Application Deadline January 31, 2018
Information Sessions December 6, 12:30pm, Smith M261
January 10, 11:30am, Smith M261
January 22, 3pm, Smith M261
HIGHLIGHTS
General Students will study urban social control by comparing Seattle to Amsterdam. We will begin our studies during Spring quarter in Seattle and the program will culminate in Amsterdam during Summer quarter.
Visas This country is part of the Schengen area. Note that there are strict rules and restrictions for foreign visitors to this area that may impact a student's ability to travel within the region before or after their program, or to attend two subsequent programs in this area. It is critical that the student reviews the information and scenarios here to learn more about Schengen area visa requirements.
 

Program Description

This program will facilitate the study of urban social control through a comparative analysis of control in Seattle and Amsterdam. By living in and studying two dense urban cities, students will explore the variety of social processes by which cities are rendered orderly. We will be interested in considering whether and how ordering processes might differ in an American city in contrast to a Dutch city. The program is designed to help students understand the key control mechanisms that make cities function, and to compare how these mechanisms work in two different cities, Seattle and Amsterdam. Through close readings, active class discussions, and fieldwork, we will develop an understanding of social control in both theory and practice, and do so through a comparative analysis of the two cities and the cultures of which they are a part. After the conclusion of this program, students will possess a deeper appreciation for the overt and covert means by which urban areas are rendered orderly, and an understanding of the larger political and philosophical questions those ordering processes necessarily generate.

Students will conduct field work in Seattle during the quarter before leaving for Amsterdam. While in Amsterdam students will be immersed in the local culture, will attend lectures from local faculty, participate in class discussions, and participate in group activities. These activities will include exploring a gentrifying neighborhood in Amsterdam, touring Amsterdam's Red Light District, visiting a marijuana coffee shop, and taking a trip to The Hague, among others.

As a whole, the program will engage students in a comparative study of two urban cities and their respective methods of social control, while creating in them more engaged, critical, and imaginative thinkers and citizens.

 

LOCATION

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Amsterdam, Netherlands

Sites

University of Amsterdam, The Hague

Housing

The students' housing is selected by the Program Director of the Summer Program Graduate School of Social Sciences at the University of Amsterdam, with my approval. Students will stay in dormitory style housing, with two students of the same gender sharing one room, and with 2 to 3 students sharing a bathroom and kitchen area. Linens will be provided. The housing is located near the University of Amsterdam.

ACADEMICS

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Prerequisites and Language Requirements

None

Credits

10 UW Credits

Courses

LSJ 401: LSJ Amsterdam and Seattle: Urban Social Control in Comparative Perspective (6 Credits)

This program will facilitate the study of urban social control through a comparative analysis of control in Seattle and Amsterdam. By living in and studying two dense urban cities, students will explore the variety of social processes by which cities are rendered orderly. We will be interested in considering whether and how ordering processes might differ in an American city in contrast to a Dutch city. The program is designed to help students understand the key control mechanisms that make cities function, and to compare how these mechanisms work in two different cities, Seattle and Amsterdam. Through close readings, active class discussions, and fieldwork, we will develop an understanding of social control in both theory and practice, and do so through a comparative analysis of the two cities and the cultures of which they are a part. After the conclusion of this program, students will possess a deeper appreciation for the overt and covert means by which urban areas are rendered orderly, and an understanding of the larger political and philosophical questions those ordering processes necessarily generate.

Students will conduct field work in Seattle during the quarter before leaving for Amsterdam. While in Amsterdam students will be immersed in the local culture, will attend lectures from local faculty, participate in class discussions, and participate in group activities. These activities will include exploring a gentrifying neighborhood in Amsterdam, touring Amsterdam's Red Light District, visiting a marijuana coffee shop, and taking a trip to The Hague, among others.

Learning goals include:
The goal of the program is to increase students' awareness of ordering processes in the city. More generally, the course will help students develop skills in critical reading, visual interpretation, public argument, and analytic writing. The goal of the readings, class discussions, and class assignments is for students to hone their skills in each of these important areas. To develop the skill of critical reading students will be asked to complete reading assignments prior to each class. Class discussions will be devoted to reviewing the important conceptual architecture of each reading and its significance for our understanding of the processes by which cities are ordered. To develop the skill of visual interpretation students will complete two field projects, which will charge them with the task of observing, describing and evaluating the processes through which cities are ordered. To develop the skill of public argument we will engage in vibrant class discussions. Each class will include whole-class and small-group discussions, in which students will be asked to contrast differing perspectives on some aspect of the policing of cities. To develop the skill of analytic writing the field projects will challenge students to articulate a clear and convincing point of view. Success in the class will require students to hone their skills in crafting well-organized, creative and comprehensive essays.

PROGRAM LEADERSHIP

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Ann Frost, Law Societies and Justice, Program Director

Ann Frost is a Full Time Lecturer in Law Societies and Justice and Sociology. Ann's research focuses on state sentencing policies during the War on Drugs, and the issues for racial and ethnic minorities that arose from these policies. Her research also addresses the racial language, both explicit and implicit, employed by state legislators and others who advocated for or against the War on Drugs. Ann is a lawyer who practiced criminal defense as a public defender for 15 years. This professional experience fueled her interest in studying the political, legal, and sociological issues that impact the American criminal justice system and the individuals who become involved in it. She continues to research these issues and to enrich her classes with these studies.
acfrost@uw.edu

Marco Brydolf-Horwitz, Sociology, Co-Director
mbrydo@uw.edu

FINANCES

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Program Expenses

Estimated Program Fee: $4,150

Included in the program fee:

  • $450 Study Abroad Fee
  • Instruction
  • Housing
  • Program activities and program travel
Not included in the program fee:
  • Airfare (average price subject to when and where your buy your ticket - $1,700)
  • Food (about $20/day)
  • UW Student Abroad Insurance ($1.74/day)
  • Other health expenses/immunizations
  • Personal spending money


Payment Due Date: July 6, 2018

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. Check your MyUW Account periodically for due dates.

Financial Aid

  • A large percentage of UW students utilize financial aid to study abroad. Most types of financial aid can be applied to study abroad fees.
  • You can submit a revision request to increase the amount of aid for the quarter you are studying abroad. These additional funds are usually awarded in the form of loans.  To apply, fill out a revision request form, attach the budget sheet (available via the link at the top of this brochure) and submit these documents to the Office of Student Financial Aid.  For more information about this process, consult the Financial Aid section of our website.
  • Consult the Financial Aid section of our website for more information on applying for financial aid, special considerations for summer and early fall programs, and budgeting and fundraising tips.

Scholarships

  • There are many scholarships designed to fund students studying abroad. The UW administers a study abroad scholarship program and there are national awards available as well.
  • Scholarships vary widely in their parameters. Some are need-based, some are location-based, and some are merit-based.
  • For UW Study Abroad Scholarships fill out a short questionnaire on your UW Study Abroad program application to be considered.  You must apply by the priority application deadline for the program in order to be considered for a scholarship.  Click the Overview tab to view application deadlines.
  • Consult our Scholarships page to learn about UW-based and national scholarships. The Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards can help you learn about additional opportunities.

Budgeting Tools

We understand that figuring out your finances for study abroad can be complicated and we are here to help. Here are some ways to find additional support:

  • Click on the Budget Sheets link at the top of this brochure to view the estimated budget of all expenses for this program.
  • Contact the Global Opportunities Adviser at goglobal@uw.edu to learn more about how to pay for study abroad.
  • Attend a Financial Planning Workshop offered by UW Study Abroad – more information is on the Events page of our website.
  • Visit the Finances section of our website.

APPLICATION CONSIDERATIONS

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Application Process

The study abroad application includes a personal statement, three short answer questions, one recommendation from a professor or TA, and electronic signature documents related to UW policies and expectations for study abroad. Following the online application process, you may be contacted by the program director for an in-person interview. Once an admission decision has been made regarding your application, you will be notified by the study abroad system via email.

Orientation

To be eligible to study abroad, you must complete the mandatory pre-departure orientation facilitated by UW Study Abroad. You must also attend program-specific orientations offered by the program director.

You must register for the UW Study Abroad orientation. You can visit the Orientation section of our website to view the current schedule and to register for an orientation session.

Orientation must be completed prior to the enrollment deadline for the quarter that you are studying abroad.

Visas

UW Study Abroad is not responsible for obtaining visas for study abroad program participants. The cost and requirements for obtaining visas vary. It is your responsibility to determine visa requirements for all countries you plan to visit while abroad including countries that you plan to visit before or after your study abroad program. This is an especially important consideration if you are planning to do more than one study abroad program. You can research visa requirements by calling the consular offices of those countries or checking the following website: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html.

Note: If you are not a U.S. citizen, consult the embassy or consulate of the countries you will visit to learn their document requirements. You can check the following website to find contact information for the consulate of the country you will be visiting: https://www.state.gov/s/cpr/32122.htm.

For non-U.S. citizens, the procedures that you will need to follow may be different than those for U.S. citizens. It is important to initiate this process as soon as possible in order to assemble documents and allow time for lengthy procedures.

Disability Accommodations

The University of Washington is committed to providing access and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, and education for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodation for this program, contact Disability Resources for Students at least 8 weeks in advance of your departure date. Contact info at disability.uw.edu.

Withdrawals

$350 of the total program fee and the $450 UW Study Abroad Fee are non-refundable once a contract has been submitted. Students withdrawing from a program are responsible for paying a percentage of the program fee depending on the date of withdrawal. More details about the withdrawal policy are included in your payment contract. No part of the program fee is refundable once the program has begun. The date of withdrawal is considered the business day a withdrawal form is received by UW Study Abroad. Notice of withdrawal from the program must be made in writing by completing the following steps:

  1. Provide notice in writing to the program director that you will no longer be participating in the program.
  2. Submit a signed withdrawal form to UW Study Abroad.

Visit the Withdrawals section of our website for more information.